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1A is home to the national conversation. The show frames the best debates with great guests in ways to make you think, share and engage.

Episodios

The News Roundup for June 25, 2021

por NPR

President Joe Biden has unveiled a strategy to combat a spike in violent crime. The strategy includes using coronavirus relief funding to hire more police officers.

And a report commissioned by the Michigan GOP on the results of the 2020 election found no evidence of fraud.

The Biden administration has indicated that the nation will miss its July 4 partial vaccination goal.

Meanwhile, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and Abdullah Abdullah, the chairman of Afghanistan's High Council for National Reconciliation, are visiting the White House Friday to discuss the withdrawal of U.S. troops from the country.

Computer virus software company founder John McAffee was found dead in a Spanish prison as his extradition to the U.S. for tax evasion was approved.

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Doorbell Cameras Are Saving Footage To The Cloud. What Happens Next?

por NPR

The popularity of home security surveillance systems like Amazon's Ring and Google Nest is rising. The devices are easy to use and they save footage from users' homes to the cloud.

But is that all they're capturing?

Some are also recording passersby, and can sometimes even reach across the street into neighbors' homes.

Why are doorbell cameras so popular and how do we balance the concerns of privacy versus security?

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From Rapping, To Writing, To Podcasting, Dessa's Resume Is Getting Longer

por NPR

While the pandemic meant a major touring hiatus for a lot of musical artists, writer, rapper, and singer Dessa kept creating content.

She hosts a new BBC podcast called Deeply Human and has a radio drama in the works.

In January, she announced a single series called "Ides," where she releases a new song on the 15th of every month. There's even one called "Terry Gross."

We talk with Dessa about keeping busy during the last year.

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How One Reporter Wants To Change The Way We Pay For Health Care

por NPR

Medical debt soared during the pandemic as people lost jobs, lost health insurance, and spent weeks in hospitals recovering from COVID-19.

ProPublica reporter Marshall Allen spent years investigating high healthcare costs. Now he wants to convince everyone they do have the power to fight the system. We ask him how.

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Local Spotlight: Returning Ancestral Land To Native Hawaiians

por NPR

For this installment of our Local Spotlight series, we talk to two reporters who investigated the Hawaiian homesteading program that aimed to return Native Hawaiians to their homeland.

The program was established in 1921 when Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalaniana'ole successfully lobbied for the passage of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act. The program was implemented in order to help the population of Native Hawaiians grow.

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The News Roundup for June 18, 2021

por NPR

Democrats look to pass the Biden administration's American Jobs and Family Plan through the Senate via a simple majority vote in July.

Nine years from the passage of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act (or DACA), the Biden administration's will push for bipartisan immigration reform.

Meanwhile abroad, President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin met for a summit in Geneva to discuss a variety of issues including election interference, Ukraine, and Russian opposition leaders.

Former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has vowed that he'll "be back" after being voted out of office on Sunday, after 12 uninterrupted years in power. His government was replaced by a shaky governing coalition of opposition parties.

And North Korean Dictator Kim Jong Un informed officials in his ruling Workers' Party that the country is growing ever closer to experiencing famine. Un reportedly said, "the people's food situation is now getting tense."

We cover all these headlines and more.

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Chronicling Capitalism: America's Relationship With The Free Market

por NPR

The NPR podcast "Throughline" looks at the history behind headlines.

In their upcoming series, hosts Rund Abdelfatah and Ramtin Arablouei look at capitalism.

According to a 2019 Gallup poll, Millenials and Gen Z are evenly split when it comes to opinions on capitalism and socialism. But those views aren't without their nuance.

We discuss the newest series and our relationship with the free market.

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Putting The B In LGBTQ

por NPR

A recent Gallup poll found that a growing number of adults identify as LGBT. One in six Gen Z adults identified as LGBT compared to the around one in 10 millennials. The survey also found that more than half of LGBT adults identify as bisexual.

But, despite their numbers, bisexuals are often overlooked and are still stigmatized by many inside and out of the LGBT community. They are far less likely than gays and lesbians to be out to the people in their lives.

We talk about the issues and unique struggles of those who identify as bi, and why visibility is such an issue.

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The State Of Voting Rights In America

por NPR

West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin announced he'd vote against the For The People Act, dealing a blow to Democrats in the fight over voting rights.

The bill promised to expand voting rights and combat the onslaught of restrictive voting laws being passed on the state level.

What does the failure to pass this legislation mean for voting rights?

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Colson Whitehead And Barry Jenkins On Making 'The Underground Railroad'

por NPR

When the novel The Underground Railroad was published in 2016, it caught the world's attention for its stark portrayal of slavery in America.

The story reimagines the metaphorical underground railroad as an actual underground railroad, with train tracks and stations. Readers follow the journey of Cora, a young woman escaping slavery in Georgia.

Now, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel has been adapted into a limited TV series of the same name, available to stream on Amazon Prime.

We speak with Barry Jenkins, the director of the show, and Colson Whitehead, the book's author.

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The News Roundup for June 11, 2021

por NPR

Pharmaceutical giants Pfizer and Moderna say they expect their COVID-19 vaccines to be available to children as young as 6 months by the fall.

COVID-19 hospitalizations have risen in states with low vaccination rates.

Meanwhile, President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris are on the move.

Harris made her first trip abroad to Central America, meeting with Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei and Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.

Biden traveled to Europe for meetings with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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The Writers' Room: Young Adult Fiction And Social Media

por NPR

Young Adult fiction is a genre can range from high fantasy to contemporary. The subject matter can be as heavy as books written for older readers. And while its characters are usually teenagers, those popular enough are often read and beloved by fans of all ages.

Those fans and their use of social media sites have made YA fiction more popular than ever.

For this installment of "The Writers' Room," we talk to three young adult fiction authors on the state of the genre and the communities that fuel it.

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The FDA Just Approved A Major Alzheimer's Drug. Now What?

por NPR

The FDA has approved a new medication for treating Alzheimer's, called aducanumab.

It's the first new drug for the disease in almost 20 years, but the FDA's approval comes despite an intense debate over the drug's efficacy and associated side effects.

We discuss what we know about the medication and how it will shape the future of Alzheimer's research and treatment.

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Teaching Race And History In America's Schools

por NPR

The latest culture war is being fought in the classroom, with several states banning Critical Race Theory.

The theory is an academic pursuit examining how race intersects with history. While many may not know the fundamentals of the theory, Republican-led state legislatures now say the decades-old concept is said to be anti-American and sow division.

We discuss what Critical Race Theory is and how America's complicated racial history should be taught.

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Head Out Of The Game: Athletes, The Press, And Mental Health

por NPR

Naomi Osaka, the No. 2 female tennis player in the world, withdrew from the French Open citing her struggles with depression and anxiety. Her withdrawal came after she announced she wouldn't be speaking to the press, a requirement for professional athletes.

Osaka's decision — and the mixed response that's followed it — has ignited a conversation about mental health in sports, specifically among Black female athletes. It's also brought attention to the strange relationship between athletes and the sports press.

How should athletes prioritize their mental health? And what responsibilities do those who administrate sports have to help them do so?

We get to all this and more.

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The News Roundup For June 4, 2021

por NPR

In America's fight against COVID-19, President Joe Biden has set his sights on getting partial vaccination rates in the U.S. up to 70 percent by July 4.

In Texas, Democrats and Republicans continue to go back and forth on voting laws, while the federal government continues to debate infrastructure.

Meanwhile, in worldwide news, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is fighting to keep his position while a coalition from across the political spectrum works to form a government.

In the worldwide COVID-19 fight, cases in some countries are on the rise, including in Malaysia. The U.K. has reported zero new COVID deaths for the first time since early 2020.

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Paula Stone Williams On 'Power, Sex, And The Patriarchy'

por NPR

Rev. Paula Stone Williams led a conservative evangelical church for over two decades. Then, in 2013, she came out as a transgender woman. Now, she fights for gender equity and LGBTQ rights.

We talk to Williams about her new memoir "As A Woman: What I Learned About Power, Sex, and the Patriarchy After I Transitioned."

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The Hit List Podcast Special

por NPR

Pop culture recommendations abound in the summer: beach reads, bingeable television shows, songs of the summer, and – of course – podcasts.

So we chatted with some podcast experts, and here are some of our recommendations for what to listen to during the summer months.

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The Tulsa Race Massacre, 100 Years Later

por NPR

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, which most Americans have never heard of.

In 1921, white Tulsa residents destroyed the Black neighborhood of Greenwood, OK, in two days of bloodshed, fire, and violence. Anywhere from 39 to more than 300 Black people were killed.

We speak with the descendants of survivors and look at the Massacre 100 years later.

We also speak with Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack about a new program to help Black farmers tackle debt.

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The News Roundup For May 28, 2021

por NPR

New York City May Bill de Blasio announced that his city is planning a full reopening of its public school system this fall. There will be no option for remote learning.

The source of COVID-19 is under new scrutiny as officials and experts are once again considering that it may have been leaked from a lab after new, albeit murky, intelligence on the subject.

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken met with government officials in Israel to advocate for a continued ceasefire in the conflict between Israel and Hamas militants in Gaza.

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How COVID-19 Is Changing Celebrity Culture

por NPR

The pandemic has shaken our relationships with celebrities. From the backlash to the "Imagine" video to the Kardashians private island getaway, the tide has been seemingly turning against the rich and famous.

Ellen compared her mansion to jail and Madonna called COVID-19 the great equalizer from her rose-petaled bathtub. Is it the end of an era for celebrities as we know them? And how is the internet changing the way we think about fame?

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When The Police Investigate The Police

por NPR

While the results of internal affairs police investigations are often kept confidential, a new podcast from KQED and NPR examines how police investigate police when they thought nobody would be watching.

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How Taxes Keep American Wealth White

por NPR

Building wealth has never been easy, and the racial wealth gap makes that obvious. As recently as 2016, the median wealth of a white household was $171,000 dollars. That's eight times the median $20,600 of Hispanic households. For Black households? Just $17,000, according to Pew Research Center.

So what needs to change? And what should people keep in mind as they try to build wealth for future generations?

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Why Is It So Hard To Talk About The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict?

por NPR

How America talks about one of its closest allies is starting to change — at least, on the left. But U.S. policy toward Israel remains the same.

What's different about the conversation this time? And why has it been so hard to talk about Israel — and the search for lasting peace with Palestinians?

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Talking, Laughing And Cringing With Ziwe

por NPR

Comedian Ziwe Fumudoh is a master at managing discomfort.

During the pandemic she pivoted from a YouTube series to Instagram Live, unflinchingly challenging her guests about their own biases, while making viewers simultaneously laugh and cringe.

Now, with a show on Showtime, Ziwe is bringing that energy to television.

We sat down with her to discuss this new show and what her future looks like.

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The News Roundup For May 21, 2021

por NPR

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell came out this week in opposition to a House proposal to create a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. The House voted to pass the bill.

Several states reached the important milestone of reporting zero deaths related to COVID-19 in a day.

And the Supreme Court sent both abortion rights and anti-abortion activists into overdrive when it decided it would hear a Mississippi case that's a direct challenge to Roe v. Wade.

Meanwhile, President Joe Biden's response to the violence in Israel came under scrutiny.

In worldwide COVID news, India reported 4,500 deaths related to COVID-19 in a 24-hour period, setting a tragic world record. Vaccine giant Serum also signaled that it won't export doses before the year's end, meaning the world's poorest nations will have to wait even longer to be protected.

We cover all this and more.

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Seeing 'Love In Color'

por NPR

What is love?

Turn on the radio, watch TV or stream a movie, and there's a high likelihood that those four little words are a common theme.

Author Bolu Babalola takes a new look at classic stories about romance in her new book "Love In Color: Mythical Tales from Around the World, Retold."

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Behind The Scenes: U.S. Diplomacy In The Middle East

por NPR

Families are once again trapped in the middle as Hamas militants and the Israeli military trade rocket fire.

At least 12 people have been killed in Israel and more than 200 have been killed in Gaza, including at least 63 children. President Joe Biden alluded to his desire for a ceasefire in a statement Monday.

We discuss the role of the U.S. in bringing about peace, how long that peace can last and much more.

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Exploring Who We Are Through What We Wear

por NPR

It's safe to say that living through a pandemic has changed our relationships with our wardrobes.

But our clothes still matter — to ourselves and to the rest of our world.

This idea — we are what we wear — is the inspiration behind Emily Spivack's "Worn Stories." It's an archival project, turned book, turned Netflix miniseries that offers vignettes into people's lives by way of their clothing.

We talk to Spivack about the project, and we dive into stories behind some of our guests favorite pieces of clothing.

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Re-entering Another New Normal

por NPR

The CDC updated its guidance, allowing vaccinated Americans to go largely maskless. That's left a lot of people with questions, and some with 're-entry anxiety'.

As plans are made, social agendas fill up, and workplaces adjust, fears about what that actually looks like are surfacing.

We discuss the CDC's latest guidelines, re-entry anxiety, and much more.

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The News Roundup For May 14, 2021

por NPR

The Biden administration is pushing to at least partially vaccinate 70 percent of the American population by July 4.

A hacking group known as DarkSide conducted a ransomware attack on the Colonial Pipeline and national security experts are investigating whether or not the group is tied to Russia.

The violence between Israel and Hamas is escalating.

And the U.S. Navy has released images of a huge cache of illicit weapons that its personnel seized from a small ship in international waters in the North Arabian Sea.

We cover the week's most important stories in the News Roundup.

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Why Is Everyone Talking About Newsletters?

por NPR

In the last ten years, it seems like newsletters have replaced blogs as the platform du jour.

And Substack helps writers profit off their own work. But the platform's success isn't without controversy.

The main criticism being who they allow on the platform.We dig into newsletters and what they mean for our media landscape.

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A 'Ton' Of Fun With Mahjong

por NPR

Mahjong came to America from China in the early 1920s. It was marketed as an ancient Chinese game, but it was actually created in the mid to late 1800s.

After World War II, the game became popular among Jewish American women.

We dive into the history and future of mahjong.

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Susan Page On Pelosi, Trump And The Washington Establishment

por NPR

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has cast a long and influential shadow over Washington and Democratic politics for decades.

As the first female Speaker of the House, Pelosi initially took on the establishment; now she is the establishment. Until Donald Trump became president, she'd been privately planning her retirement.

USA Today's Susan Page joins us to talk about her new biography on Pelosi, chronicling the years before that prepared her for what would prove to be the political battle of her life.

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Strike A 'Pose:' A Conversation With Angelica Ross

por NPR

We talk with Pose star Angelica Ross about the end of the series, her own work around trans representation in the tech industry, and what's next for queer people of color onscreen.

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