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A daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper.

Episodios

Behrouz Boochani on the detainees we forgot

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Behrouz Boochani spent six years detained on Manus Island, a victim of Australia’s Pacific Solution. Last year he was granted refugee status in New Zealand, and since then has used his freedom to advocate on behalf of the hundreds of other asylum seekers detained by Australia. One group of detainees, the Murugappan family from Biloela, were recently moved from Christmas Island into community detention in Perth.  But has their case shifted attention from those still trapped by Australia’s immigration system? Today writer and former detainee, Behrouz Boochani on the refugees we aren’t speaking about, and the reasons why.    Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper Behrouz Boochani.  


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The world’s first pandemic games

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Tens of thousands of athletes and officials are about to descend on Tokyo as the city prepares to host the 32nd Olympic games.  But with Covid-19 cases surging in Japan, health experts and the majority of the Japanese public are opposed to the event being held at all.  So, why are the Olympic Games going ahead?  Today, sports writer Kieran Pender on the institution, and the vested interests, behind this pandemic Olympics.    Guest: Sports writer Kieran Pender. Complete our listener survey to go into the draw for a chance to win one of ten limited-edition 7am tote bags. Competition closes at 11.59pm on July 2, 2021. Visit: 7ampodcast.com.au/survey  


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The government vs Friendlyjordies

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YouTuber Friendlyjordies has built up a significant audience in recent years through his pointed and acerbic political videos.  But he’s also attracted controversy, with the deputy Premier of NSW suing him for defamation.  Now, one of the comedian’s producers has been arrested by a controversial police unit established to explicitly focus on ideological extremists.  Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the friendlyjordies saga, and why a state government seems intent on turning him into a martyr.   Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton.  


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Science is evolving, but are our ethics keeping up?

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Recent breakthroughs in science and medicine have demonstrated that we may be much closer to being able to artificially grow and replace human organs than ever before.  But, those developments are also challenging long established ethical guidelines around the use of embryos, or embryo-like cells. Today, science writer and contributor to The Monthly Elizabeth Finkel on the latest scientific breakthroughs, and the argument that our ethics need to evolve alongside our knowledge of the world.   Guest: Science writer and contributor to The Monthly Elizabeth Finke.  


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The Culture: Barry Jenkins' new masterpiece, The Underground Railroad

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The Underground Railroad, a new series on Amazon Prime, is based on the Pulitzer Prize winning novel of the same name by Colson Whitehead.  It's directed by Barry Jenkins, who also directed the 2016 Best Picture winner Moonlight and the follow up, If Beale Street Could Talk.  The show is one of the most gripping, powerful and visceral series out this year, and it’s an opportunity to explore what prestige television looks like in 2021, and how it can help us confront our history and grapple with the present. Guest: Award-winning writer, filmmaker and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Santilla Chingaipe  


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Australia backs coal as the G7 pledge climate action

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As the leaders of the world’s wealthiest democracies gathered to discuss climate change, and pledged further action, the Australian government chose to reiterate its commitment to fossil fuels. With Prime Minister Scott Morrison out of the country the Nationals leader Michael McCormack used the spotlight to take a swipe at renewable energy advocates and talk up coal. Today, contributing editor to The Monthly Rachel Withers on how the Coalition is increasingly out of step with both the international community and voters at home. Guest: Contributing editor to The Monthly Rachel Withers.  


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You and Q’s army?

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The QAnon conspiracy theory, focused on a belief in the existence of a Satanic child sexual abuse ring, has been collecting followers worldwide.  Here in Australia one of its adherents is a man called Tim Stewart, who also happens to be a long-time friend of Prime Minister Scott Morrison.  Now, questions are being asked about Tim Stewart’s influence on the Prime Minister.  Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Richard Cooke on what drives people to Q-Anon, and the threat it poses in Australia.    Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper Richard Cooke.  


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The Americanisation of Australia’s health system

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Australia’s health care system is facing unprecedented amounts of pressure. Our public health systems have been cut back for decades, and now the private system is facing a death spiral… with younger Australians opting out of increasingly pricey insurance options. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on why some health experts are worried that Australia’s health care system is becoming more and more like the expensive, privatised model in the US.   Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton. Complete our listener survey to go into the draw for a chance to win one of ten limited-edition 7am tote bags. Competition closes at 11.59pm on July 2, 2021. Visit: 7ampodcast.com.au/survey  


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The Biloela family speaks out

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Speaking from a hospital in Perth, Priya Murugappan details her daughter’s sickness and her family’s struggle in detention. More than three years after they were taken from their home in Biloela, the Tamil family just want to be settled. Medical records show their children are deficient in Vitamin D and have psychological issues related to being locked up.   Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Rebekah Holt.  


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The Culture: How Western Sydney is redefining hip-hop

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Hip-hop is the biggest musical genre in the world right now, and one of the fastest growing locally, but in Australia it still feels like it hasn’t quite broken through and dominated the mainstream yet, in the way it has overseas - especially in the US and UK.  Acts like the Hilltop Hoods and Bliss n Eso helped popularise Australian hip-hop in the mid-2000s, but while they were achieving commercial success, a much grittier and raw kind of hip-hop was coming out of housing commission estates in Sydney and Melbourne. Known as gutter rap, or lad rap, this underground subgenre never saw much airplay and didn’t sell heaps of records, but it influenced a generation of artists redefining hip-hop in Australia today. Writer, journalist and contributor to The Saturday Paper and The Monthly, Mahmood Fazal, joins The Culture to discuss the history of Australia’s underground hip-hop scene and how it feeds into the music being made today. Guest: Writer, journalist and contributor The Saturday Paper and The Monthly, Mahmood Fazal  


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Australia’s biggest ever crime sting

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This week, Scott Morrison announced Australia’s involvement in a massive organised crime sting coordinated by the FBI. He pushed for greater security powers, but some observers believe what he really wants is a distraction from bad news and poor polling.   Guest: Contributing editor for The Monthly Rachel Withers.  


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It’s textbook ‘how not to run a war’

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After 20 years of war, Australia gave three days’ notice before closing its embassy in Kabul. The dramatic end expresses how unsafe Afghanistan still is and how little the conflict achieved. But the decision also leaves hundreds of local staff vulnerable to retaliation by the Taliban.    Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton.  


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You had one job, Greg Hunt

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A further outbreak of Covid-19 in Victorian aged-care homes was not just a possibility: it was almost a given. Even before a vaccine was available, the federal government ended the support payment intended to stop casual staff working across multiple sites. That is exactly how the virus spread.   Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton.  


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What’s next for Christian Porter

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Christian Porter’s decision to settle his defamation suit against the ABC is the end of one battle. But the former attorney-general, accused of a historic rape he strenuously denies, is still fighting on at least two other fronts. Mike Seccombe on how the so-called ‘Defamation trial of the century’ ended - and what happens next.   Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe.  


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The Australian spy novelist charged with espionage in China

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Australian writer Yang Hengjun has been detained by the Chinese government since 2019. He’s been charged with espionage offences, but the exact nature of what he’s accused of has never been revealed. He’s now awaiting the verdict of a secret trial held a few weeks ago, with the death penalty one possibility.  Linda Jaivin is a former China correspondent and the author of ‘The Shortest History of China’. Today, she unpacks the mysterious case of Yang Hengjun and what his treatment says about the Chinese government's approach to human rights.   Guest: Writer Linda Jaivin.  


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The Culture: Olivia Rodrigo takes over

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Olivia Rodrigo’s hit single ‘driver’s license’ is undeniably the biggest song of 2021 so far. Now the actor turned singer-songwriter has released her debut album ‘Sour’, which has broken streaming and chart records. But who is Olivia Rodrigo and why has a teenage girl’s break-up album resonated with so many people of all ages? This week on The Culture we explore what her enormous success says about the way pop stars are manufactured in this current era, with music writer and critic for The Saturday Paper Shaad D’Souza.   Guest: Music critic for The Saturday Paper, Shaad D’Souza.  


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Weekend Read: Sarah Krasnostein on the most hated man

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Today, Sarah Krasnostein, the best-selling author of ‘The Trauma Cleaner’, reads her essay from the latest issue of The Monthly.  It’s called ‘The most hated man’ and it explores the sentencing of Richard Pusey, who was convicted of outraging public decency after he filmed the horrific aftermath of a car crash that killed four police officers.   Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Sarah Krasnostein. Background reading: The most hated man in The Monthly  


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Scott Morrison dodges responsibility

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For the past week the federal government has been locked in a tussle with Victoria over who is responsible for financially supporting those suffering the economic consequences of another lockdown. Scott Morrison and his ministers have tried to shift the responsibility onto their state counterparts, but grudgingly gave ground on Thursday, acknowledging they did have a role to play. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the fresh political challenges facing the federal government. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  


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Why it keeps happening to Victoria

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Yesterday, Victorians were told the state’s seven day ‘circuit breaker’ lockdown would be extended for another week, as health authorities race to contain the latest Covid-19 outbreak.  It’s the fourth lockdown in the state since the start of the pandemic, and now questions are being asked about why Victoria in particular seems so susceptible to the spread of the virus.  Today, health columnist at The Saturday Paper Dr Melanie Cheng on what went wrong this time and what it will take to control this outbreak.   Guest: Health columnist for The Saturday Paper Dr Melanie Cheng.  


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Australia breaches international law, again

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Last month, under the cover of the federal budget, the Coalition government rushed through new laws legalising the indefinite detention of refugees. Australia’s embrace of indefinite detention puts us at odds with international law, and it’s led to condemnation from human rights groups. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on how Australia got to this point, and what it means for those seeking safety in our country.   Guest: National Correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: Australian government legalises ‘a crime against humanity’ in The Saturday Paper  


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The vaccine race Australia is losing

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As Covid-19 case numbers in Victoria continue to rise, attention has turned to the slow pace of the vaccine rollout, and the question of whether or not more vaccinations could have stopped this outbreak. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on where the rollout went wrong and what the consequences have been. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton.  


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How to make a law for consent

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For years, advocates against sexual assault have been pushing for law reform, particularly on the issue of consent.  Now - they’ve had a win, with the NSW Attorney General announcing sweeping changes, which go even further than what was recommended by an independent inquiry. Today, writer for The Saturday Paper Bri Lee on what the changes mean, and the politician leading the charge.  Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Bri Lee.  


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The Culture: The problem with our true crime obsession

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Whether it’s podcasts like ‘Serial’ or ‘The Teacher’s Pet’, Netflix documentaries like ‘Making a Murderer’ or ‘Tiger King’, true crime is absolutely dominant.  But what does our obsession with these stories say about us, and our perception of the world we live in? And with institutions like the police and the media under increasing scrutiny from the public, is it time for a genre like true crime to reinvent itself? This week on The Culture we discuss all of that and more with Sarah Krasnostein, the best-selling author of ‘The Trauma Cleaner’, criminal law expert, and The Saturday Paper’s TV critic.   Guest: Sarah Krasnostein. TV critic for The Saturday Paper.  


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Who's to blame for Victoria's lockdown?

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Victoria has been plunged back into lockdown, the state’s fourth since the start of the pandemic. But this time there’s one big difference: vaccines that were supposed to help keep us safe and avoid outbreaks like this are now available, but in Australia take up has been slow. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on how Victoria entered lockdown and who shoulders the blame. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  


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The frontline women’s services at risk of collapse

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The federal budget promised $3.2 billion dollars to be spent on policies that improve the lives of Australian women.  But, despite that pledge, a critical front line service that supports women being discriminated against at work has lost much of its funding, and now faces closure.  Today, Royce Kurmelovs on the future of the Working Women’s Centres.    Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Royce Kurmelovs.  


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Why isn’t Labor cutting through?

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It’s been two years since former Opposition Leader Bill Shorten lost the federal election, and then the Labor leadership. Now, as the major parties gear up for an impending federal election, which could be held this year, questions are being asked about whether Shorten’s replacement Anthony Albanese is capable of securing Labor victory. Today, writer for The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace on Labor’s election chances, and what they’ve learnt from the last two years. Guest: Writer for The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace. Background reading: Labor’s election chances in The Saturday Paper  


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The government's war on charities

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The Morrison government is contemplating new laws which could see charities held responsible for minor legal breaches by their members and supporters.  The sector says the changes are an attempt to stifle protest, while lawyers are warning they could be unconstitutional.  Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on why the government is targeting charities, and what the changes could mean.    Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe.  


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Are Australians too complacent about Covid-19?

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Australia’s rollout of the Covid-19 vaccine has been stymied by a combination of different factors including supply, distribution and vaccine hesitancy amongst the public. A recent survey found that nearly one in three Australians aren’t willing to get vaccinated because they’re unsure about the risks or don’t think it’s necessary. Today, health columnist for The Saturday Paper Dr Melanie Cheng, on where Australia went wrong with its vaccine rollout and what the federal government needs to do to avoid a third wave.   Guest: Health columnist for The Saturday Paper Dr Melanie Cheng.  


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Introducing 'The Culture': a new weekly show

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The Culture is a brand new weekly show from the team behind 7am. Every week join host Osman Faruqi and special guests as they go deep on film, music, TV, streaming, books and art. The first episode drops May 28. Follow The Culture now!  


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Morrison doubles down on Fortress Australia

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For over a year now Australia’s international borders have been closed to the rest of the world. Travel restrictions have played a crucial role in keeping Australia relatively safe from the worst of the pandemic, but the federal government has been reluctant to announce their end date. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on why Prime Minister Scott Morrison is so intent on keeping our borders closed. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno.  


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Facing prison for cultural fishing

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Sixty years ago commercial licenses were handed out to Australian fishers working in the lucrative shellfish industry. Since then, the families that obtained those licenses have made fortunes.  But many Aboriginal people whose ancestors have fished along the coast for tens of thousands of years have been locked out of the trade. Aboriginal fishers, like Yuin elder Keith Nye, have been described as “poachers” by industry and government, and face jail time for selling what they catch.  Today, writer for The Monthly Paul Cleary on the trial of Keith Nye and his fight against the criminalisation of his culture.  Guest: Writer for The Monthly Paul Ceary. Background reading: A load of abalone in The Monthly  


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The politician behind a new anti-abortion push

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In an attempt to fend off allegations of sexism within the Coalition, Prime Minister Scott Morrison reshuffled his cabinet earlier this year.  But his choice for Australia’s new Assistant Minister for Women, Amanda Stoker, has been controversial from the outset. Her hardline, and conservative, views on abortion have raised concerns from women’s health advocates.  Today, journalist for The Saturday Paper Rachel Withers on the rise of Amanda Stoker. Guest: Journalist for The Saturday Paper Rachel Withers. Background reading: Who is Amanda Stoker? in The Saturday Paper  


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Gaza’s deadliest day

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For the past week the Palestinian territory of the Gaza Strip has been under an intense aerial bombardment. Last Sunday was the deadliest day in the conflict so far. Two Israeli airstrikes in Gaza killed at least 43 Palestinians, including eight children. On the same day, more than 100 rockets were fired from Gaza towards Israel. Today, world editor for The Saturday Paper Jonathan Pearlman on why the violence in Israel and Palestine is at its worst point in years.   Guest: World editor for The Saturday Paper Jonathan Pearlman. Gaza journalist Maha Hussaini.  


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Kate Manne on why we don't believe women

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Five years on from when MeToo went global, high profile allegations of assault and harassment still make headlines but justice rarely seems to be served. Today, writer and philosopher Kate Manne on why we need to not only believe women, but create a society that actually cares when they are harmed.   Guest: Contributor for The Monthly Kate Manne. Background reading: How to lose her voice in The Monthly  


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Fighting racism in Australian sport

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When Rana Hussain’s family migrated to Australia from India they brought with them a passion for cricket, though it wasn’t long before Rana fell in love with Australia’s biggest sporting code: the AFL. But navigating the blokey, Anglo-centric world of Australian football in the 1990s wasn’t easy for a young Muslim woman. Her experiences during that time galvanised her to become an advocate for diversity and inclusion in sports. Today, Rana Hussain on the racism problem in Australian sport, and how to fight it.   Guest: Diversity and inclusion expert Rana Hussain. Background reading: AFL diversity consultant Rana Hussain in The Saturday Paper  


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