Boxcars711 Old Time Radio Pod

de Bob Camardella

A Feature of W.P.N.M Radio

Episodios

Episode 7798: Whitehall 1212 - "The Case Of Duncan Frazier (12-09-51)

por Bob Camardella

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The Case Of Duncan Frazier (Aired December 9, 1951)

 

The Whitehall 1212 series boasted that for the first time Scotland Yard opened its files and the producers promised to bring to the public authentic true stories of some of the most celebrated cases. Permission for these records came from Sir Harold Scott, Commissioner of the yard at that time. There is actually a Black Museum. This area is located on the lower ground floor of Scotland Yard and it does indeed contain articles that are closely associated with the solving of a crime. And "Whitehall 1212" was the actual emergency phone number for the yard at the time. The research for the shows was done by Percy Hoskins, chief crime reporter for the London Daily Express. For the benefit of American audiences, Wyllis Cooper of Quiet Please fame was hired as script writer. Interestingly enough both the Black Museum and Whitehall 1212 had all-British casts; both ran concurrently. Whereby Mutual Broadcasting System aired the Orson Welles version, NBC offered the Wyllis Cooper one.

THIS EPISODE:

 December 9, 1951. NBC netWork. "The Case Of Duncan Frazier"- Sustaining. Sidney Patterson's body has been found in a burning building. But, he was shot in the back! Mr. Patterson then turns out to be Duncan Frazier! The teeth tell the story. Percy Hoskins (researcher), Wyllis Cooper (writer, director). 29:24. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Episode 7797: All In The Family - Edith's Winning Ticket (12-09-72)

por Bob Camardella

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Edith's Winning Ticket (Aired December 12, 1972)

 

All in the Family is an American situation comedy that was originally broadcast on the CBS television network from January 12, 1971 to April 8, 1979. In September 1979, the show was revamped, and given a new title, Archie Bunker's Place. This version of the sitcom lasted another four years, ending its run in 1983. Produced by Norman Lear, it was based on the British television comedy series Till Death Us Do Part. The show broke ground in its depiction of issues previously considered unsuitable for U.S. network television comedy, such as racism, homosexuality, women's liberation, rape, miscarriage, abortion, breast cancer, the Vietnam War, menopause and impotence. The show ranked #1 in the yearly Nielsen ratings from 1971 to 1976. As of 2010 it has, along with The Cosby Show and American Idol, been one of only three shows to top the ratings for at least five consecutive seasons.

THIS EPISODE:

December 9, 1972. "Edith's Winning Lottery Ticket" - Edith finds a winning lottery ticket in her purse. Thinking they're in the money, Archie tells Edith to collect. But Archie is once again foiled by his wife's honesty – the ticket, along with the prize, is really Louise Jefferson's. Archie, determined to collect the prize he thinks is rightfully the Bunkers', nearly brings an end to the friendship between Edith and Louise. 26:41.


Episode 7796: Bold Venture - "Passage For Mario Carrada" (10-22-51)

por Bob Camardella

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"Passage For Mario Carrada" (10-22-51)

 

Bold Venture is a 1951-1952 syndicated radio series starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. Morton Fine and David Friedkin scripted the taped series for Bogart's Santana Productions. Salty seadog Slate Shannon (Bogart) owns a Cuban hotel sheltering an assortment of treasure hunters, revolutionaries and other shady characters. With his sidekick and ward, the sultry Sailor Duval (Bacall), tagging along, he encounters modern-day pirates and other tough situations while navigating the waters around Havana. Aboard his boat, the Bold Venture, Slate and Sailor experience "adventure, intrigue, mystery and romance in the sultry settings of tropical Havana and the mysterious islands of the Caribbean." Calypso singer King Moses (Jester Hairston) provided musical bridges by threading plot situations into the lyrics of his songs. Music by David Rose. Beginning March 26, 1951, the Frederic W. Ziv Company syndicated 78 episodes. Some sources have claimed that the 78 episodes include reruns, and that there were only around 30 episodes but more than 50 shows have now come to light. Heard on 423 stations, the 30-minute series earned $4000 weekly for Bogart and Bacall.

THIS EPISODE:

October 22, 1951. Program #31. ZIV Syndication. "Passage for Carada" aka: A Row At the Cannery. Two respected men have been murdered. The son of one, Carada, is held captive. Slade wants to find him "alive". Peter Leeds as Felipe the bank teller. Sheldon Leonard as Johnny Thomas and Juan Miguel. Tony Barrett as Mario Carada. Jester Hairston as King Moses.Nestor Paiva as Inspector La Salle. 27:33. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Episode 7795: WPNM Oldies Broadcast #106

por Bob Camardella

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From The 'Heart' Of Historic Germantown

"Where The Oldies Are Still Young"

A Feature Of The Boxcars711 Old Time Radio Podcast

 

Prior to the onset of podcasting, Bob Camardella hosted WPNM Internet Radio, broadcasting a combination of talk, easy listening and early rock and from his hometown in Philadelphia, Pa.

Bob was writer and bass singer for a popular 60's rock group with 6 releases on the Twist & Algonquin (EMI) labels. He's a member of Broadcast Music Inc. (BMI) and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP).


Episode 7794: The Adventures Of Ozzie & Harriet - Sidewalk Superintendents (11-16-51)

por Bob Camardella

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Sidewalk Superintendents (11-16-51)

 

The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet premiered on ABC on October 10, 1952, staying until September 3, 1966. The show strove for realism and featured exterior shots of the Nelsons' actual southern California home at 1822 Camino Palmero Street in Los Angeles as the fictional Nelsons' home. Interior shots were filmed on a sound stage recreated to look like the real interior of the Nelsons' home. Like its radio predecessor, the series focused mainly on the Nelson family at home, dealing with run-of-the-mill problems. As the series progressed and the boys grew up, storylines involving various characters were introduced. Many of the series storylines were taken from the Nelsons' real life.  Show Notes From The Old Time Radio Researcher's Group and The Digital Deli.

THIS EPISODE:

ABC network. "Sidewalk Superintendents (11-16-51)" - Sponsored by: Heinz Foods. The entire Nelson family become captivated by a construction project and try sidewalk superintending. The middle commercial has been deleted. Ozzie Nelson, Harriet Hilliard, Billy May (composer, conductor), David Nelson, Ricky Nelson, John Brown, Lurene Tuttle, Herb Vigran, Barbara Nelson, Verne Smith (announcer). 28:31. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Episode 7793: Barry Craig Confidential Investigator

por Bob Camardella

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A Ghost Of A Chance [Remo Torch] 12-19-51

 

A Ghost Of A Chance [Remo Torch] Aired December 19, 1951 Barry Craig, Confidential Investigator is one of the few detective radio series that had separate versions of it broadcast from both coasts. Even the spelling changed over the years. It was first "Barry Crane" and then "Barrie Craig". NBC produced it in New York from 1951 to 1954 and then moved it to Hollywood where it aired from 1954 to 1955. It attracted only occasional sponsors so it was usually a sustainer.William Gargan, who also played the better known television (and radio) detective Martin Kane, was the voice of New York eye BARRY CRAIG while Ralph Bell portrayed his associate, Lt. Travis Rogers. Craig's office was on Madison Avenue and his adventures were fairly standard PI fare. He worked alone, solved cases efficiently, and feared no man. As the promos went, he was "your man when you can't go to the cops. Confidentiality a speciality."Like Sam Spade, Craig narrated his stories, in addition to being the leading character in this 30 minute show. Nearly sixty episodes are in trading circulation today.

THIS EPISODE:

December 19, 1951. NBC network. "A Ghost Of A Chance". Sustaining. Not auditioned. "A man comes back from the dead to haunt a wife whose been dead amost as long as he has; in an insurance scheme that almost, but not quite cancels out (Barrie Craig)." Don Pardo (announcer), John Roeburt (writer), William Gargan, Fran Carlon, Himan Brown (director). 31:06. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Episode 7792: Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Tales Of The Texas Rangers" (09-30-51)

por Bob Camardella

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Death Shaft (Aired September 30, 1951)

 

Tales of the Texas Rangers, a western adventure old-time radio drama, premiered on July 8, 1950, on the US NBC radio network and remained on the air through September 14, 1952. Movie star Joel McCrea starred as Texas Ranger Jayce Pearson, who used the latest scientific techniques to identify the criminals and his faithful horse, Charcoal (or "Charky," as Jayce would sometimes refer to him), to track them down. The shows were reenactments of actual Texas Ranger cases. The series was produced and directed by Stacy Keach, Sr., and was sponsored for part of its run by Wheaties. Captain Manuel T. "Lone Wolf" Gonzaullas, a Ranger for 30 years and who was said to have killed 31 men during his career, served as consultant for the series. The series was adapted for television from 1955 to 1957 and produced by Screen Gems.

THIS EPISODE:

September 30, 1951. NBC network. "Death Shaft". Sustaining. Based on events of November 18, 1941. A skeleton is found in a deserted mine, with the skull bashed in. The program features a tribute to M. T. "Lone Wolf" Gonzales, who is retiring after thirty-one years with the Rangers. The program may be dated September 25, 1951. Ken Christy, William Johnstone, Lamont Johnson, Brad Browne, Joel McCrea, M. T. Lone Wolf Gonzaullas, Hal Gibney (announcer), Stacy Keach (producer, director), Bob Wright (writer, possibly "Robert Ryf"), Tony Barrett, Betty Lou Gerson. 30:20. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

Episode 7791: The Adventures of Frank Race - The Roughneck's Will (09-25-49)

por Bob Camardella

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"The Adventure Of The Roughneck's Will"

 

The Adventures of Frank Race, by Bruce Ells Productions, was first heard in May of 1949. The main character, Frank Race, was an attorney before World War II. As a result of his activities in the war, when it was over, he traded his law books for a career with the OSS. There, "Adventure" became his business. Tom Collins played the role of Frank Race initially, immediately following his stint as Chandu, The Magician. The lead role was taken over later by Paul Dubof.

 

THIS EPISODE:


September 25, 1949. Program #22. Broadcasters Program Syndicate syndication. "The Adventure Of The Roughneck's Will". Commercials added locally. A ninety-year old billionaire leaves a will specifically designed to encourage his beneficiaries to kill each other. Tom Collins, Buckley Angel (writer, director), Joel Murcott (writer, director), Bruce Eells (producer), Ivan Ditmars (organist), Art Gilmore (announcer), Tony Barrett, Frank Lovejoy, Gloria Blondell, Wilms Herbert, Michael Ann Barrett. 27:44. "Episode Notes From Radio Gold Index".


Episode 7790: Our Miss Brooks - 'Mister Conklin's Blood Pressure" (07-03-49)

por Bob Camardella

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'Mister Conklin's Blood Pressure" (Aired July 3, 1949)

 

Then CBS chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script---Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal---Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on CBS July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast---blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright---also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-1949, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcas that March.


THIS EPISODE:


July 3, 1949. 'Mister Conklin's Blood Pressure" - CBS network. Sponsored by: Palmolive Soap, Lustre Creme Shampoo, Palmolive Shave Cream. Plans for the July 4th weekend at Eagle Springs aren't as easy as they sound! Eve Arden, Jane Morgan, Gale Gordon, Gloria McMillan, Verne Smith (announcer), Richard Crenna, Jeff Chandler, Larry Berns (producer), Al Lewis (writer, director), Wilbur Hatch (music), Bob Lemond (announcer), Howard McNear (doubles). 29:40. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Episode 7789: Academy Award Theater - The Informer (Aired May 25, 1946)

por Bob Camardella

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The Informer (05-25-46)

 

The list of films and actors on Academy Award Theater is very impressive. Bette Davis begins the series in Jezebel, with Ginger Rogers following in Kitty Foyle, and then Paul Muni in The Life of Louis Pasteur. The Informer had to have Victor Mclaglen, and the Maltese Falcon, Humphrey Bogart, Sidney Greenstreet (this movie was his first major motion picutre role) plus Mary Astor for the hat trick. Suspicion starred Cary Grant with Ann Todd doing the Joan Fontaine role, Ronald Coleman in Lost Horizon, and Joan Fontaine and John Lund were in Portrait of Jenny. How Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Pinocchio were done is something to hear! Some films are less well known, such as Guest in the House, with Kirk Douglas and Anita Louise, It Happened Tomorrow, with Eddie Bracken and Ann Blythe playing Dick Powell and Linda Darnell's roles, and Cheers for Miss Bishop with Olivia de Havilland. Each adaptation is finely produced and directed by Dee Engelbach, with music composed and conducted by Leith Stevens.

From Wikipedia - The Informer is a 1935 dramatic film, released by RKO. The plot concerns the underside of the Irish War of Independence, set in 1922. It stars Victor McLaglen, Heather Angel, Preston Foster, Margot Grahame, Wallace Ford, Una O'Connor and J. M. Kerrigan. The screenplay was written by Dudley Nichols from 1925 the novel of the same title by Liam O'Flaherty. It was directed by John Ford. The novel had previously been adapted for a British film The Informer (1929). Along with Mutiny on the Bounty, The Informer was a big contender at the 8th Academy Awards, competing directly in all six categories they were nominated for (though Mutiny got eight nominations in total, given its three Best Actor nominations). The Informer won four Oscars: Best Director for Ford, Best Actor for McLaglen, Best Writing Screenplay for Nichols, and Best Score. In 2018, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

THIS EPISODE:

May 25, 1946. Program #343. "The Informer" - CBS network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. A quality upgrade rebroadcast. AFRS program name: "Armed Forces Radio Theater." The program may be dated May 15, 1946. Victor McLaglen, Margo Graham, Wallace Ford, J. M. Kerrigan. 29:44. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Episode 7788: The Abbott & Costello Show - Lou Goes To The Race Track (03-13-47)

por Bob Camardella

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Lou Goes To The Race Track (03-13-47)

 

The Abbott and Costello Show mixed comedy with musical interludes (usually, by singers such as Connie Haines, Marilyn Maxwell, the Delta Rhythm Boys, Skinnay Ennis, and the Les Baxter Singers). Regulars and semi-regulars on the show included Artie Auerbrook, Elvia Allman, Iris Adrian, Mel Blanc, Wally Brown, Sharon Douglas, Verna Felton, Sidney Fields, Frank Nelson, Martha Wentworth, and Benay Venuta. Ken Niles was the show's longtime announcer, doubling as an exasperated foil to Abbott & Costello's mishaps (and often fuming in character as Costello insulted his on-air wife routinely); he was succeeded by Michael Roy, with announcing chores also handled over the years by Frank Bingman and Jim Doyle. Abbott and Costello moved the show to ABC (the former NBC Blue Network) five years after they premiered on NBC. During their ABC period they also hosted a 30-minute children's radio program(The Abbott and Costello Children's Show.)

THIS EPISODE:

March 13, 1947. "Lou Goes To The Race Track" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Camels, Prince Albert Pipe Tobacco. Costello has to get rid of $38,000 before the income tax is due, so the boys visit the race track. Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Skinnay Ennis and His Orchestra, Marilyn Maxwell, John Brown, Michael Roy (announcer). 29:50. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Episode 7787: Michael Buble - Georgia On My Mind and Thats All (Live 2005)

por Bob Camardella

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FOR FULL MOVIE OPTIONS
DOWNLOAD AND SAVE WITH WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER
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ANY FORMAT SUCH AS AVI-MP4 OR MOVIE


ALL AUDIO SHOWS ARE MP3


Michael Steven Bublé OC OBC (IPA: /buːˈbleɪ/ boo-BLAY; born September 9, 1975) is a Canadian singer, songwriter, and record producer. His first album reached the top ten in Canada and the United Kingdom. He found a worldwide audience with his 2005 album It's Time as well as his 2007 album Call Me Irresponsible – which reached number one on the Canadian Albums Chart, the UK Albums Chart, the US Billboard 200, the Australian ARIA Albums Chart and several European charts. Bublé's 2009 album Crazy Love debuted at number one on the US Billboard 200 after three days of sales, and remained there for two weeks. It was also his fourth number one album on Billboard's Top Jazz Albums chart. His 2011 holiday album, Christmas, was in first place on the Billboard 200 for the final four weeks of 2011 and the first week of 2012, totalling five weeks atop the chart, it also made the top 5 in the United Kingdom. With this, Christmas became his third-consecutive number-one album on the chart. To Be Loved was released in April 2013. Bublé has sold over 40 million records worldwide,and won numerous awards, including four Grammy Awards and multiple Juno Awards. Bublé is a dual citizen of Canada and Italy.

Episode 7786: A Date With Judy - "Going To A Frank Sinatra Movie" (03-20-45)

por Bob Camardella

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Going To A Frank Sinatra Movie (Aired March 20, 1945)



A Date with Judy was an American radio program during the 1940s. It was a teenage comedy that began as a summer replacement for Bob Hope's show, sponsored by Pepsodent and airing on NBC from June 24 to September 16, 1941, with 14-year-old Ann Gillis in the title role. Dellie Ellis portrayed Judy when the series returned the next summer (June 23-September 15, 1942). Louise Erickson took over the role the following summer (June 30 - September 22, 1943) when the series, sponsored by Bristol Myers, replaced The Eddie Cantor Show. Louise Erickson continued as Judy for the next seven years, as the series, sponsored by Tums, aired from January 18, 1944 to January 4, 1949. As the popularity of the radio series peaked, Jane Powell starred as Judy in the MGM movie, A Date with Judy (1948). Co-starring with Powell were Elizabeth Taylor, Wallace Beery, Robert Stack, and Carmen Miranda. Ford Motors and Revere Cameras were the sponsors for the final season of the radio series on ABC from October 13, 1949 to May 25, 1950. A Date with Judy was also a comic book (based on the radio program) published by National Periodical Publications from October-November 1947 to October-November 1960.

 

THIS EPISODE:


March 20, 1945. "Going To A Frank Sinatra Movie" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Tums. Guest Frank Sinatra sings, "Night and Day" and "I Don't Know Why I Love You Like I Do." Judy and Oogie go to a Sinatra movie. Afterwards, Judy dreams about Frankie. Richard Crenna sings, "Got A Date With Judy." The system cue has been deleted. Richard Crenna, Dix Davis, Frank Sinatra, Louise Erickson, John Brown, Aleen Leslie (creator, writer). 29:22. Episode Notes From Radio Gold Index.



Episode 7785: The Screen Director's Playhouse - D.O.A. (06-21-51)

por Bob Camardella

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D.O.A. (Aired June 21, 1951)

 

Screen Director's Playhouse is a popular radio and television anthology series which brought leading Hollywood actors to the NBC microphones beginning in 1949. The radio program broadcast adaptations of films, and original directors of the films were sometimes involved in the productions, although their participation was usually limited to introducing the radio adaptations, and a brief "curtain call" with the cast and host at the end of the program. The series later had a brief run on television, focusing on original teleplays and several adaptations of famous short stories (such as Robert Louis Stevenson's "Markheim").

THIS EPISODE:
 
June 21, 1951. NBC network. "D. O. A.". Commercials deleted. A man is given a slow acting poison. Listen for a Les Paul and Mary Ford record in the background of the first scene. Director Rudolph Mate is introduced, but is not heard on this recording. Director Frank MacDonald appears in his place. The phrase, "Take him for a ride" is used with a straight face. Edmond O'Brien, Peggy Castle, Jimmy Wallington (announcer), Frank MacDonald, Jan Rarick (? piano), Howard Wiley (production supervisor), Bill Cairn (director). 1:02:50. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Episode 7784: The Crime Club - "Dead Man Control (03-20-47)"

por Bob Camardella

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Dead Man Control (Aired March 20, 1947)



Crime club was a Mutual Network murder and mystery series, a product of the Doubleday Crime Book Club imprints found weekly in bookstores everywhere. The telephone rings"Hello, I hope I haven't kept you waiting. Yes, this is the Crime Club. I'm the Librarian. Murder Rents A Room? Yes, we have that Crime Club story for you.Come right over. (The organist in the shadowed corner of the Crime Club library shivers the ivories) The doorbell tones sullenly"And you are here. Good. Take the easy chair by the window. Comfortable? The book is on this shelf." (The organist hits the scary chord) "Let's look at it under the reading lamp." The Librarian, played by Raymond E. Johnson, begins reading the tale. Veteran Willis Cooper (Lights Out, Quiet Please) did some of the scripts from the Crime Club books.

THIS EPISODE:

March 20, 1947. Mutual network. "Dead Men Control". Sustaining. A millionaire is killed while opening his wall safe. A large diamond is found missing, but is found again too soon. Helen Riley (writer), Ted Osborne, Alice Frost, Elspeth Eric. 31:14. Episode Notes Boxcars711.


Episode 7783: The CBS Radio Mystery Theater (or CBSRMT)

por Bob Camardella

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In The Dark (Aired January 8, 1981)


The CBS Radio Mystery Theater (or CBSRMT) was an ambitious and sustained attempt to revive the great drama of old-time radio in the 1970s. Created by Himan Brown (who had by then become a radio legend due to his work on Inner Sanctum Mysteries and other shows dating back to the 1930s), and aired on affiliate stations across the CBS Radio network, the series began its long run on January 6, 1974. The final episode ran on December 31, 1982. The show was broadcast nightly and ran for one hour, including commercials. Typically, a week consisted of three to four new episodes, with the remainder of the week filled out with reruns. There were a total of 1399 original episodes broadcast. The total number of broadcasts, including reruns, was 2969. The late E.G. Marshall hosted the program every year but the final one, when actress Tammy Grimes took over. Each episode began with the ominous sound of a creaking door, slowly opening to invite listeners in for the evening's adventure. At the end of each show, the door would swing shut, with Marshall signing off, "Until next time, pleasant...dreams?


THIS EPISODE:


CBS Radio Mystery Theater -  IN THE DARK (01-08-81). In a totalitarian state, a woman's husband fails to return home. Her best friend has mysteriously "divorced" her husband, and her friends refuse to talk to her. Despite evidence, she cannot believe the secret police have kidnapped her husband. Teri Keane, Carol Teitel, Ray Owens, Ralph Bell. Episode Notes From Old Time Radio Digest.


Episode 7782: CBS Radio Workshop - The Silent Witness (07-14-57)

por Bob Camardella

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The Silent Witness (Aired July 14, 1957)


Beginning with CBS' Columbia Workshop from 1936 to 1947, CBS set out to experiment with Radio--to push that invisible envelope of the speed of sound, the speed of light, and to capitalize on the human listeners' comparitively narrow band of audible sound. Not so much experiment in terms of hardware technology, as in Radio's earliest efforts in 'broad casting' radio transmissions, but in concept, engineering, scoring and production technique. The most well-known and widely acclaimed proponent of these techniques was Norman Corwin. Corwin was so critically and popularly successful in experimental broadcasts that CBS gave him virtual carte blanche to produce whatever projects he deemed of possible interest--at least until the HUAC years anyway. Corwin's well-deserved acclaim aside, the various other CBS experimental programming efforts over the years very much set the bar for other networks.

THIS EPISODE:
 
July 14, 1957. CBS network. "The Silent Witness". Sustaining. An excellent tour-de-force trial drama. Done with only one voice, that of the only performer on the show, Raymond Burr. All other roles on this courtroom drama are played by the listener's imagination. This was what radio was all about! Raymond Burr. 24:09. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

Episode 7781: The Shadow

por Bob Camardella

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"The Shadow"

 

"The Shadow" - One of the most popular radio shows in history. The show went on the air in August of 1930. "Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow knows!" The opening lines of the "Detective Story" program captivated listeners and are instantly recognizable even today. Originally the narrator of the series of macabre tales, the eerie voice known as The Shadow became so popular to listeners that "Detective Story" was soon renamed "The Shadow," and the narrator became the star of the old-time mystery radio series, which ran until 1954.


Agnes Moorehead, the first Margot LaneA figure never seen, only heard, the Shadow was an invincible crime fighter. He possessed many gifts which enabled him to overcome any enemy. Besides his tremendous strength, he could defy gravity, speak any language, unravel any code, and become invisible with his famous ability to "cloud men's minds." Along with his team of operatives, the Shadow battled adversaries with chilling names like The Black Master, Kings of Crime, The Five Chameleons, and, of course, The Red Menace.
The Shadow's exploits were also avidly followed by readers in The Shadow magazine, which began in 1931 following the huge success of the old-time mystery radio program. The magazine was published by Street & Smith, who had also sponsored the old-time mystery radio program. Over the course of 18 years, Street & Smith published 325 issues of The Shadow, each one containing a novel about the sinister crime fighter. These stories were written by Maxwell Grant, a fictional name created by the publishing company. Although several different people wrote under the pseudonym, Walter B. Gibson wrote most of the stories, 282 in all. Most of the novels published have been reprinted in paperback and The Shadow adventures remain popular today, with Shadow comic books, magazines, toys, games, cds and cassettes of old-time radio shows, and books bringing top dollar among collectors the world over.


 The Shadow. September 26, 1937. Mutual Network. "The Death House Rescue". Blue Coal. The first show of the series with "The Shadow" as a force against crime and not just a phantom announcer. Just before an innocent man is to be executed for murder, The Shadow uses mental telepathy to get the goods on the real killers. A good show with an intelligent plot. Orson Welles, Agnes Moorehead, William Johnstone, Jeanette Nolan, Ray Collins (triples), Paul Stewart, Elia Kazan, Everett Sloane (quadruples), Paul Huber (commercial spokesman), Frank Readick (opening and closing voice), Arthur Whiteside (announcer), Edward Hale Bierstadt (writer), Elsie Thompson (organist), Clark Andrews (producer), Martin Gabel (director), Edith Meiser (story editor), Walter B. Gibson (story consultant), J. R. Poppele (sound engineer), Thomas Coffin Cooke (commercial spokesman, as "John Barclay"), Walter Gibson (writer). 29:12. Episode Notes From "The Radio Gold Index".

Episode 7780: Dragnet - The Big Drifter

por Bob Camardella

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The Big Drifter

Dragnet was an American radio series, enacting the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show took its name from the police term "dragnet", meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects. Dragnet is perhaps the most famous and influential police procedural drama in media history. The series gave audience members a feel for the boredom and drudgery, as well as the danger and heroism, of police work. Dragnet earned praise for improving the public opinion of police officers.


Actor and producer Jack Webb's aims in Dragnet were for realism and unpretentious acting. He achieved both goals, and Dragnet remains a key influence on subsequent police dramas in many media. The show's cultural impact is such that after seven decades, elements of Dragnet are familiar to those who have never seen or heard the program. The ominous, four-note introduction to the brass and tympani theme music (titled "Danger Ahead"), composed by Walter Schumann, is instantly recognizable. It is derived from Miklós Rózsa's score for the 1946 film version of The Killers.  Another Dragnet trademark is the show's opening narration: "Ladies and gentlemen: the story you are about to hear is true. Only the names have been changed to protect the innocent." This underwent minor revisions over time. The "only" and "ladies and gentlemen" were dropped at some point. Variations on this narration have been featured in subsequent crime dramas, and in parodies of the dramas (e.g. "Only the facts have been changed to protect the guilty").

The radio series was the first entry in a Dragnet media franchise encompassing film, television, books and comics.

 

THIS EPISODE:


February 23, 1950. Program #37. NBC network. "The Big Drifter". Fatima. "Gentleman Wallace," a born con-man, takes advantage of two used-car dealers, and many others. Jack Webb, Barton Yarborough. 29:33. Show Notes From The Rado Gold Index.

 

Episode 7779: Fibber McGee & Molly (01-25-44)

por Bob Camardella

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Fibber McGee and Molly

Fibber McGee and Molly was a 1935–1959 American radio comedy series. The situation comedy was a staple of the NBC Red Network from 1936 on, after originating on NBC Blue in 1935. One of the most popular and enduring radio series of its time, it ran as a stand-alone series from 1935 to 1956, and then continued as a short-form series as part of the weekend Monitor from 1957 to 1959. The title characters were created and portrayed by Jim and Marian Jordan, a husband-and-wife team that had been working in radio since the 1920s.

Fibber McGee and Molly, which followed up the Jordans' previous radio sitcom Smackout, followed the adventures of a working-class couple, the habitual storyteller Fibber McGee and his sometimes terse but always loving wife Molly, living among their numerous neighbors and acquaintances in the community of Wistful Vista. As with most radio comedies of the era, Fibber McGee and Molly featured an announcer, house band and vocal quartet for interludes. At the peak of the show's success in the 1940s, it was adapted into a string of feature films. A 1959 attempt to adapt the series to television with a different cast and new writers was both a critical and commercial failure, which, coupled with Marian Jordan's death shortly thereafter, brought the series to a finish.

Five days after the wedding, Jim received his draft notice. He was sent to France, and became part of a military touring group which entertained the armed forces after World War I. When Jim came home from France, he and Marian decided to try their luck with a vaudeville act. They had 2 children, Kathryn Therese Jordan (1920–2007) and James Carroll Jordan (1923–1998).

THIS EPISODE:

 Fibber McGee and Molly. January 25, 1944. NBC net. Johnson's Wax. First appearance of Marlin Hurt as "Beulah." The closet is heard. Fibber and Molly celebrate the return of their laundry with a night out on the town. Wistful Vista night life leaves much to be desired!. Jim Jordan, Marian Jordan, Marlin Hurt, Shirley Mitchell, Ransom Sherman, Arthur Q. Bryan, Harlow Wilcox, Billy Mills and His Orchestra, The King's Men, Don Quinn (writer), Phil Leslie (writer). 29:30. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

Episode 7778: Episode 4606

por Bob Camardella

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The Adventures Of Sam Spade

The Fairly-Bright Caper (Aired October 31, 1948) The Adventures of Sam Spade was a radio series based loosely on the private detective character Sam Spade, created by writer Dashiell Hammett for The Maltese Falcon. The show ran for 13 episodes on ABC in 1946, for 157 episodes on CBS in 1946-1949, and finally for 51 episodes on NBC in 1949-1951. The series starred Howard Duff (and later, Steve Dunne) as Sam Spade and Lurene Tuttle as his secretary Effie, and took a considerably more tongue-in-cheek approach to the character than the novel or movie. In 1947, scriptwriters Jason James and Bob Tallman received an Edgar Award for Best Radio Drama from the Mystery Writers of America. Before the series, Sam Spade had been played in radio adaptations of The Maltese Falcon by both Edward G. Robinson (in a 1943 Lux Radio Theater production) and by Bogart himself (in a 1946 Academy Award Theater production), both on CBS.

THIS EPISODE:

October 31, 1948. CBS network. "The Fairly Bright Caper". Sponsored by: Wildroot Cream Oil. Spade is hired to protect a Halloween party, which is only slightly complicated by a witch and a murder! Howard Duff, Lurene Tuttle, Dick Joy (announcer), Dashiell Hammett (creator). 29:28. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Episode 7777: Your's Truly Johnny Dollar

por Bob Camardella

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(A Humphrey/Camardella Production)

By Jim Widner


The opening is familiar among fans of Old Time Radio: "the man with the action-packed expense account...America's fabulous freelance insurance investigator." And if we still weren't sure, he always told us himself: "Yours truly, Johnny Dollar."
Opening on a Friday night, February 18, 1949 (The Paricoff Policy Matter), right at the start of television's golden age, this radio show brought us a high-powered insurance investigator who worked chiefly for the Universal Adjustment Bureau, a clearinghouse for the many insurance companies. The series starred Charles Russell as Johnny Dollar, the smart and tough detective, whose trademark it was to toss silver dollars as tips to busboys and bellhops.


Appearing on CBS Radio, Johnny Dollar was heard each week flying off to a different town filled with danger and possibly murder as he tried to get to the bottom of insurance fraud. There were rarely any recurring characters except Dollar; despite sometimes romance and friends, the character was generally a loner. These early episodes, however, tended to be flat and the character of Dollar too dry. So at the start of the 1950 season, Charles Russell was out and veteran film actor Edmund O'Brien stepped in as the second Johnny Dollar. The series during the O'Brien years improved with scripts by expert crime writer such as E. Jack Neumann, John Michael Hayes, Sidney Marshall and Blake Edwards. The character took on the stereotype of the American detective developed by Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler. Dollar was more hardboiled; his softer side rarely appeared. O'Brien left in 1952 and John Lund became Dollar number three. With Lund in the role, the character as developed by O'Brien remained.

And Bailey's depiction of Dollar had shades of a gritty street fighter, yet bright and sensitive. With a strong cast (many of the same veteran radio actors appearing in different roles) and excellent directing, the portrayals were much more real. And exciting; listen to such serials as "The Open Town Matter" or "The MacCormack Matter." Even while radio drama was already declining, this was radio acting at its best. The sound effects, some of which were canned, fit into the scripts so well as to produce some very exciting adventure/mystery.
But doing a daily show live was taxing, so by the end of 1956, the series reverted to thirty minute, once-a-week episodes. But the power of the show continued, due a lot to the continued presence of both Bailey and Johnstone. Gradually, however, toward the end of the 1950's, the show began to sound tired - some of the scripts were weak and even Bailey did not always seem excited.


Bailey left the show when it moved to New York production studios and initially Bob Readick filled Johnny Dollar's shows. However, that was only a transistion that lasted six months. In June, 1961, Mandel Kramer came to the role. He was perhaps the second best of the Dollar portrayals. Kramer's Dollar displayed more cynical humor than Bailey's. Johnny Dollar remained sensitive yet tough and with Jack Johnstone continuing as producer, the series remained poignant right up to its demise.


Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar has the distinction of being the last dramatic radio series from the golden age of radio. As with the close of Suspense, radio drama sounded its death throes. Among many old time radio fans, Johnny Dollar is usually viewed as the division between original radio drama and the resurgence of nostalgia which began in the seventies.

Episode 4603: Episode 4604

por Bob Camardella

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"Who's on First?"
A Boxcars711
VIDEO (MOVIE)
Using Your Favorite Player

"Who's On First?" is a comedy routine made famous by American comedy duo Abbott and Costello. The premise of the sketch is that Abbott is identifying the players on a baseball team for Costello, but their names and nicknames can be interpreted as non-responsive answers to Costello's questions. For example, the first baseman is named "Who"; thus, the utterance "Who's on first" is ambiguous between the question ("Which person is the first baseman?") and the answer ("The name of the first baseman is 'Who'").


Who's on First?" is descended from turn-of-the-century burlesque sketches that used plays on words and names. Examples are "The Baker Scene" (the shop is located on Watt Street) and "Who Dyed" (the owner is named "Who"). In the 1930 movie Cracked Nuts, comedians Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey examine a map of a mythical kingdom with dialogue like this: "What is next to Which." "What is the name of the town next to Which?" "Yes." In British music halls, comedian Will Hay performed a routine in the early 1930s (and possibly earlier) as a schoolmaster interviewing a schoolboy named Howe who came from Ware but now lives in Wye. By the early 1930s, a "Baseball Routine" had become a standard bit for burlesque comics across the United States. Abbott's wife recalled him performing the routine with another comedian before teaming with Costello.


Bud Abbott stated that it was taken from an older routine called "Who's The Boss?", a performance of which can be heard in an episode of the radio comedy program It Pays to Be Ignorant from the 1940s. After they formally teamed up in burlesque in 1936, he and Costello continued to hone the sketch. It was a big hit in the fall of 1937, when they performed the routine in a touring vaudeville revue called Hollywood Bandwagon.
In February 1938, Abbott and Costello joined the cast of The Kate Smith Hour radio program, and the sketch was first performed for a national radio audience on March 24 of that year.

Episode 4602: Episode 4603

por Bob Camardella

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 The Satellite Of Death Pt.1 & 2 COMPLETE (06-10-52)

 

Tom Corbett is the main character in a series of Tom Corbett — Space Cadet stories that were depicted in television, radio, books, comic books, comic strips, coloring books, punch-out books and View-Master reels in the 1950s. The stories followed the adventures of Tom Corbett, Astro, and Roger Manning, cadets at the Space Academy as they train to become members of the elite Solar Guard. The action takes place at the Academy in classrooms and bunkroom, aboard their training ship the rocket cruiser Polaris, and on alien worlds, both within our solar system and in orbit around nearby stars. The Tom Corbett universe partook of pseudo-science, not equal to the standards of accuracy set by John W. Campbell in the pages of Astounding. And yet, by the standards of the day, it was much more accurate than most media science fiction. 


TODAY'S SHOW:


June 10, 1952. ABC network, WJZ, New York aircheck. <B><I>"Satellite Of Death Part One & Two COMPLETE)</B></I>". Sponsored by: Kellogg's Pep, Kellogg's Raisin Bran. A gang is trying to take over Rhea, a moon of Saturn, to get a monopoly of Viricide F-3. Drex Hines (director), Frank Thomas Jr., Jackson Beck (announcer), Jan Merlin, Neal O'Malley, Don Hughes (writer), Jon Gart (organist). 24:01.

Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index


Episode 4601: Big Town - I Remember Murder (11-30-48)

por Bob Camardella

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Big Town - I Remember Murder (11-30-48)

I Remember Murder (Aired November 30, 1948)

 The stories were well written and directed by William N. Robson as well as McGill. The skill of this group shows in making the series very good radio. The show was a big promoter of the free press and the first amendment with its opening sequence: "Freedom of the press is a flaming sword! Use it justly...hold it high...guard it well!" The second series began immediately in the 1943 season when the production moved from Hollywood to New York. Robinson left (Trevor left two years earlier as her career starting taking off) and McGill reorganized the series placing Edward Pawley in the role of Wilson opposite Fran Carlon as Lorelei. Pawley's Wilson was more mellifluous compared to the rather nasty Robinson. The series' success continued on radio until 1952 leaving only the television version (which began in 1950). (Thanks to Robert G. Corder, author of a new biography of Edward Pawley.)

THIS EPISODE:

November 30, 1948. NBC network. "I Remember Murder". Sponsored by: Lifebuoy, Rinso. A band-leader steals $50,000 from The High Hatters Club and leaves town in a hurry. After he's "taken for a ride," the girl singer who was with him developes amnesia. "Harry The Hack" finds her...and the murder victim too. Edward Pawley, Fran Carlon, Mason Adams, Jerry McGill (writer, director). 29:26. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

Episode 4600: Once Upon a Long Time Ago

por Bob Camardella

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Created By YouTube.com/HerBunk

Episode 4598: The Legend Of Mickey Mantle

por Bob Camardella

Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995), nicknamed The Commerce Comet and The Mick, was an American professional baseball player. Mantle played his entire Major League Baseball (MLB) career (1951–1968) with the New York Yankees as a center fielder, right fielder, and first baseman. Mantle was one of the best players and sluggers and is regarded by many as the greatest switch hitter in baseball history. Mantle was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974 and was elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999. Mantle was one of the greatest offensive threats of any center fielder in baseball history. He has the second highest career OPS+ among center fielders, (behind Mike Trout) and he had the highest stolen base percentage in history at the time of his retirement. In addition, compared to the other four center fielders on the All-Century team, he had the lowest career rate of grounding into double plays, and he had the highest World Series on-base percentage and World Series slugging percentage. He also had an excellent .984 fielding percentage when playing center field. Mantle was able to hit for both average and power, especially tape measure home runs, a term that had its origin in a play-by-play caller reacting to one of Mantle's 1953 home runs. He hit 536 MLB career home runs, batted .300 or more ten times, and is the career leader (tied with Jim Thome) in walk-off home runs, with 13—twelve in the regular season, one in the postseason. He is the only player in history to hit 150 home runs from both sides of the plate. Mantle hit some of the longest home runs in Major League history. On September 10, 1960, he hit a ball left-handed that cleared the right-field roof at Tiger Stadium in Detroit and, based on where it was found, was estimated years later by historian Mark Gallagher to have traveled 643 feet (196 m). Another Mantle homer, hit right-handed off Chuck Stobbs at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. on April 17, 1953, was measured by Yankees traveling secretary Red Patterson (hence the term "tape-measure home run") to have traveled 565 feet (172 m). Deducting for bounces, there is no doubt that both landed well over 500 feet (152 m) from home plate. Mantle two times hit balls off the third-deck facade at Yankee Stadium, nearly becoming the only player to hit a fair ball out of the stadium during a game. On May 22, 1963, against Kansas City's Bill Fischer, Mantle hit a ball that fellow players and fans claimed was still rising when it hit the 110-foot (34 m) high facade, then caromed back onto the playing field. It was later estimated by some that the ball could have traveled 504 feet (154 m)[38] had it not been blocked by the ornate and distinctive facade.

Episode 4597

por Bob Camardella

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Guns For Every One Archibald "Archie" Bunker is a fictional character from the 1970s American television sitcom All in the Family and its spin-off Archie Bunker's Place, played by Carroll O'Connor. Bunker, a main character of the series, is a World War II veteran, blue-collar worker, and family man. All in the Family premiered on January 12, 1971, where he was depicted as the head of the Bunker family. In 1979, the show was retooled and renamed Archie Bunker's Place; it finally went off the air in 1983. Bunker lived at the fictional address of 704 Hauser Street in the borough of Queens, in New York City. All in the Family got many of its laughs by playing on Archie's bigotry, although the dynamic tension between Archie and his liberal son-in-law, Mike, provided an ongoing political and social sounding board for a variety of topics. Archie appears in all but seven episodes of the series. Three fifth season episodes were missed because of a contract dispute between O'Connor and series creator Norman Lear. In 1999, TV Guide ranked Archie Bunker number 5 on its 50 Greatest TV Characters of All Time list.[2] In 2005, Archie Bunker was listed as number 1 on Bravo's 100 Greatest TV Characters,[3] defeating runners-up such as Ralph Kramden, Lucy Ricardo, Fonzie, and Homer Simpson. Archie's chair is in the permanent collection of the National Museum of American History.

Episode 818: Episode 4596Bobby Caldwell Dave Koz - What You Wont Do For Love

por Bob Camardella

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WATCH WITH WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER The performances at this year’s Soul Train Awards were nothing short of legendary. The award ceremony featured the perfect mix of the old and the new, and the occasional fusion of both at the same time, making for a night of music accessible for every kind of music-lover. You would be forgiven for thinking some of the older performers of the night had stumbled upon the fountain of youth; nailing complex choreography without missing even a single beat. Big Daddy Kane is one artist that deserves special recognition. Despite being close of 50 years of age he still got down -literally- during his performance of “Warm It Up, Kane” by doing the splits half way though a dance break, getting up as if it was nothing and jumping straight back onto the mic. Gladys Knight, Ron Isley, and Chrisette Michele also led a rousing tribute to the great Dionne Warwick, performing many of her greatest hits – Including “Walk On By” and “That’s What Friends Are For.” Bobby Caldwell also put the younger performers to shame with a perfect rendition of his song “What You Won’t Do.” Accompanied by Dave Koz on tenor sax, their performance was certainly something to behold. The audience knew every word, singing and dancing along to the familiar track. Although, if twitter is anything to go by, it was also interesting to see how many long-time Caldwell fans realized he represents the ‘blue-eyed’ side of soul for the first time last night. Show Notes By David La Rosa

Episode 817: Episode 4594

por Bob Camardella

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21ST PRECINCT was one of the realistic police drama series of the early- to mid-1950's that were aired in the wake of DRAGNET. NBC's DRAGNET had proven that a realistic police show could attract and hold an audience. In 1953 CBS decided to use New York City as the backdrop for their own half-hour police series and focus on the day-to-day operation of a single police precinct. Actual cases were used as the basis for stories. The Precinct Captain acted as the narrator for the series. THIS EPISODE: April 14, 1954. "The Brother" CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. The music fill has been deleted. Everett Sloane, John Ives (producer), Stanley Niss (writer, director), Eileen Palmer, Bryna Raeburn, Wendell Holmes, Joe DeSantis, Martin Newman, Santos Ortega, Art Hannes (announcer). 26:55. Compiled By: Stewart Wright Initial Compilation: 07/07/2002 Last Updated: 06/30/2006 Copyright 2002, 2006 by Stewart Wright Audition Show: None First Show: 07/07/1953 Last Show: 11/01/1956 Number of Shows: 159 Length: 30 minutes

Episode 816: Andy Gibb

por Bob Camardella

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Testing Bob Camardella 816

Episode 815: Episode 4592

por Bob Camardella

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LoR 47-06-21 (162) Babs Almost Gets a Job in San Francisco WPNM Old radio Camardella

Episode 814: Episode 4591

por Bob Camardella

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our miss brooks boxcars711 WPNM

Episode 813: Episode 4589

por Bob Camardella

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Bobby Caldwell Live "Coming Down From Love" Camardella WPNM Kids&Family gunsmoke

Episode 812: Episode 4588

por Bob Camardella

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Let George Do It - Your Money Or Your Life (February 28, 1949)