1A

de NPR

A national conversation with sharp guests and thought-provoking debates.

Episodios

2021, The Year Of The 'Sad Girl'

por NPR

Between Adele's new album"30," Taylor Swift's re-release of "Red," and a new song from Mitski, it's been quite a month for so-called "sad girl" music – a category of female artists whose searing, poetic lyrics about breakups and heartache accompany us through our days.

Even before November, this year has been dominated by a bevy of sad girls – from Olivia Rodrigo to Julien Baker, and from Phoebe Bridgers to Billie Eilish.

But what really is sad girl music? Is it anything new? And what makes it so resonant right now?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Homicide Or Self-Defense: The Rittenhouse And Arbery Cases

por NPR

Jury deliberations are underway in the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse. The 17-year-old is charged with homicide following the shooting deaths of Anthony Huber and Joseph Rosenbaum. The shooting occurred during the Black Lives Matter protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, last summer.

Meanwhile, in Brunswick, Georgia, the trial of Greg and Travis McMichael for the shooting death of Ahmad Arbery is now going ongoing. The men are charged with homicide after shooting Arbery while he was on a run last February. The defense claimed Arbery was a burglar and they were defending property.

Both cases are predicated on the argument of self-defense. Will the jurors find that the McMichaels and Rittenhouse were justified in their actions?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Clearing Camps: The Pandemic, America's Cities, And Homelessness

por NPR

The pandemic exposed many gaps in modern society, but few people are more familiar with those gaps than those experiencing homelessness. That's especially true in Washington D.C., where the number of chronically unhoused people increased by more than 20 percent last year. That's also meant an increase in encampments across the city.

This year, the district launched a pilot program to clear encampments and put people into housing.

We also look at what's happening in Los Angeles, where homelessness is a top concern. The city passed a ban on camping and is set to clear at least 70 spots with hundreds more possibly on the horizon.

From D.C. to L.A., how are cities responding to encampments and what are the best solutions?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The Maps Are In: The Redistricting Process And The Midterm Elections

por NPR

It's that time of the year: states are releasing their new congressional maps.

The maps drawn during the redistricting process are significant because of what they could reveal about the 2022 midterm elections. Roughly half the country has proposed or finalized new maps, but some think Democrats have already missed their shot.

We unpack what these maps mean and where they might lead us in 2022.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

'Southern Belle Insults' with Keke Palmer And Jasmine Guillory

por NPR

If you follow Keke Palmer on social media, you're probably familiar with her alter ego, Lady Miss Jacqueline, and her southern belle insults.

Now, the character is being brought to life as a part of a short story collection by Palmer and writer Jasmine Guillory, author of the best-selling romance novels "The Wedding Date" and "The Proposal."

The collection is aptly titled "Southern Belle Insults." The stories are full of fun, shade, and wit, but also cover deeper themes like confidence and self-love.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The News Roundup for November 12, 2021

por NPR

Republican Rep. Paul Gosar came under for this week for tweeting an animated video of him killing Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and President Joe Biden. Gosar's face is superimposed over a character from the popular anime series "Attack on Titan" as they kill other characters sporting the faces of his Democratic colleagues.

President Biden is continuing to advance his agenda. His administration is touting the infrastructure bill as a win for the former senator. But now the White House must shift its focus to addressing rising consumer prices and funding the government through Dec. 3.

Meanwhile, thousands of migrants are stranded at the border of the European Union in Poland, stuck in camps in freezing weather.

The government of Ethiopia has detained at least 16 U.N. staff members working in the capital city of Addis Ababa, accusing them of "wrongdoing and participation in terror."

We cover all this and more during the News Roundup.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

When Schools Ban Books

por NPR

In late October, Republican Texas state legislator Matt Krause wrote a letter to the Texas Education Agency asking it to look into how 850 books are being used in state schools. According to a breakdown of Krause's list from Book Riot, about two-thirds of the books explore LGBT storylines or feature LGBT characters. Another 15 percent or so could be categorized as sexual education. About 8 percent discuss race and racism.

While the censorship of some books in schools is nothing new, a growing number of challenges are against books about identity.

And pushback on certain books isn't limited to Texas.

We look into which books are being challenged and why. Then we sit down with the authors of three of those books for their perspectives.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Travis Scott, Astroworld, and Crowd Safety

por NPR

At least eight people have died and 300 hundred were injured due to crowd surges this weekend at a Houston-based music festival called Astroworld. It's estimated that 50,000 people attended. It was the third annual festival run and headlined by rapper Travis Scott.

Scott released a video in response to the tragedy saying he plans to cover the funeral costs of those who died. But lawsuits are still piling up against the artist for "negligence and encouragement of violence."

And it's not the first time the artist, sometimes called hip hop's "King of Rage," has come under fire for fan casualties at his concerts. In 2017, a man named Kyle Green was paralyzed after he jumped off a balcony at a Travis Scott show.

So how will this tragedy affect Scott's image now? And what responsibility does an artist have in crowd control?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Probing COP 26's Promises

por NPR

Climate change is a global problem. That's why most of the world's leaders have been meeting in Scotland for the last week at a United Nations Climate Conference known as COP26.

It's the conference where many of those same countries committed to the lofty emissions goals in the Paris Climate Agreement. To date, progress toward that goal has been less than stellar.

Should we expect anything major to come from COP26? What promises are being made this time around?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Codifying Consent: California's New Law On 'Stealthing.'

por NPR

Last month, California became the first state to outlaw "stealthing" — the slang term for removing a condom during sex without consent.

Advocates say the ban could catalyze a legislative sea change and help people understand that stealthing is a form of sexual violence.

We talk with the assembly member behind the bill and a survivor about the road ahead.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Huma Abedin Steps Out Of The Background

por NPR

From Hillary Clinton's time in the White House as the first lady to her most recent presidential run, Huma Abedin has walked briskly behind.

She's been called Hillary's shadow and right-hand woman. She quickly became a trusted aide – although firmly in the background.

But Abedin's life came crashing into the spotlight during her now estranged husband's sexting scandal. Her marriage to former New York Rep. Anthony Weiner was marked by public scrutiny and betrayal. All the while, she was trying to work behind the scenes to elect the first woman president.

Now, she steps out from behind the scenes, this time on her own terms in her new memoir, Both/And: A Life in Many Worlds.

We talk to Abedin about her new memoir.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The News Roundup for November, 2021

por NPR

It was a big week for elections around the nation. Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin defeated Democrat Terry McAuliffe in the Virginia gubernatorial election. Michelle Wu became the first-ever person of color to be elected mayor of Boston.

The Centers for Disease Control approved the COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 5-11.

The trial of Kyle Rittenhouse began this week. Rittenhouse is accused of murdering two protesters in Wisconsin during protests over racial justice.

The government of Ethiopia declared a state of emergency this week as rebels from the Tigray region near the capital of Addis Ababa. Authorities have called on citizens to "arm themselves."

At the COP26 summit, India pledged to work to be carbon-neutral by 2070.

And as Afghanistan's economy continues its freefall, the Taliban have made the decision to ban the use of foreign currency.

We discuss all this and more during the News Roundup.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

When It Comes to Immigration Where Does the Biden Administration Stand?

por NPR

President Joe Biden campaigned on the promise to build a fair and humane immigration system. Now, immigration advocates are pressuring him to end two policies from the Trump Administration, including the Migrant Protection Plan (MPP), better known as Remain in Mexico.

MPP was announced in 2018 and requires asylum seekers to stay in Mexico while they wait for a court decision on their case, which can often take months. Immigration advocates called it illegal and inhumane.

Biden announced he would end the controversial policy earlier this year. But in August, the Supreme Court ordered MPP to be reinstated. Now his administration is fighting to terminate the policy in court.

Meanwhile another Trump-era immigration policy is in effect. Title 42 has been enforced since March of last year, making it even harder for migrants to seek asylum. Trump authorized Title 42 due to fears of spreading COVID-19. The policy expels migrants back to Mexico or their home country if they cross the border illegally. Biden has not said anything about when he might end that policy despite criticism from lawmakers, and immigration lawyers.

We discuss the Biden administration's stance on immigration and how these policies affected asylum seekers.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The NRA's Misfire

por NPR

The National Rifle Association is in trouble. The organization filed for bankruptcy in January 2021 in an attempt to head off ongoing litigation threatening the group. The most serious is a case brought in August 2020 by the attorney general of New York, Letitia James, which is "seeking to dissolve the organization entirely." The lawsuit accuses NRA leaders of corruption and diverting millions of dollars for their own pleasure.

NPR correspondent Tim Mak has been tracking the NRA in his reporting for years. In his new book, Misfire: Inside The Downfall of the NRA, Mak investigates the group and its longtime CEO, Wayne LaPierre.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The Daylight Saving Debate

por NPR

This weekend marks the end of Daylight Saving Time... for this year anyway.

But there's a bill in Congress to make it permanent, which would mean never changing our clocks again.

Nineteen states have already made it clear that they'd make the switch if Congress says okay.

How did this biannual ritual come about anyway? And what are our other options?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Inflation Nation: The Long-Term Effects Of Rising Costs

por NPR

Prices are going up, and according to economists, there's a good chance they're not coming back down for a while.

A breakdown in the global supply chain and a shortage of workers are driving the cost of many goods up.

Periods of inflation always have ripple effects on the economy and this time is no different.

We find out what's up with inflation, and how long the consequences could last.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Listen If You Dare: Exploring Our Belief In Ghosts

por NPR

Phantoms. Spirits. Apparitions. The other side. Nearly half of Americans believe in ghosts. The concept of spirits is present in cultures around the world. Their existence permeates books, movies, and folklore.

What would you do if you were faced with the existence of something you couldn't explain?

Glynn Washington, the host of the podcast Spooked, presented by Snap Judgment, joins us to share some of his favorite ghost stories. And we hear from professor Chris French about a scientific explanation for the paranormal.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The News Roundup for October 29, 2021

por NPR

Reports indicate that the Biden administration privately told interested lawmakers that the portion of the social spending bill devoted to climate will amount to $500 billion. If true, the climate portion of the bill will be its biggest slice.

The Virginia gubernatorial election, touted as one of the year's most important, is heating up as it reaches its final stretch.

And state and local authorities continue to resist federal vaccine mandates.

Meanwhile, it's been a big week for the Vatican. President Joe Biden is meeting with Pope Francis. And the pope has also agreed to visit Canada following revelations concerning the Church's role in the deaths of thousands of native children.

Following rising tensions with China, Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen confirms U.S. troops have been training the Taiwanese military.

We cover all this and more during the News Roundup.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Extremely Online: What's Up With WhatsApp?

por NPR

WhatsApp has over 2 billion users worldwide, but some Americans were unaware of just how popular it is until the Facebook outage earlier this month.

WhatsApp has also fallen victim to privacy and misinformation scandals in recent months, but that's gotten less buzz.

What are the implications of millions of people relying on one app for communication, news, and business?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

What It's Like To Come Of Age During A Pandemic

por NPR

The last year and a half has certainly been rough on teens across the country.

But what else has it meant? Introspection? Growth? Connection? Action? For three high school students, all of the above.

We hear from them about what it's really like to be a young person during the pandemic. Plus, how they're connecting with their community — and with themselves — through student activism and documenting teen life.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Life In Prison Gets a New Chapter

por NPR

Since 2017, the podcast Ear Hustle has showcased the daily realities of life inside San Quentin State Prison in California. Eight seasons later, it's still going strong.

Earlonne Woods is the show's co-host and co-producer. In 1999, he was sentenced to 31 years to life in prison. In November 2018, his sentence was commuted after 21 years served.

Nigel Poor is also a co-host and co-producer. She's a visual artist and photography professor at California State University in Sacramento.

They are co-authors of the new book "This Is Ear Hustle: Unflinching Stories of Everyday Prison Life."

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

How Safe Are America's Film Sets?

por NPR

Last week, actor and producer Alec Baldwin fired a prop gun that killed cinematographer Halyna Hutchins on the set of his new film "Rust." The film's director, Joel Souza, was also hit and injured by a bullet and was hospitalized before being released.

The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees sent an email to its members alleging that the gun used in the scene contained a live round.

IATSE has been arguing that America's film sets are unsafe since before the shooting, even threatening to go on strike over the issue. A strike is off the table for now, but many members still feel unsatisfied.

What's the state of America's film sets?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

From Chili-Eating Contests To Ultramarathons, Why Do We Seek Pain For Pleasure?

por NPR

If you've ever burnt your hand on a stove and someone told you it's "all in your head," they're technically not wrong. Our sensory receptors communicate with the brain to create the sensation of pain.

But if pain is... painful, why do some of us seek it out?To find out, journalist Leigh Cowart interviewed ultramarathoners, spice aficionados, lovers (practitioners) of BDSM, and other pain-seekers about why they do what they do.

We talk about the link between pain and pleasure — and hear your stories and questions about pain on purpose.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The News Roundup for October 22, 2021

por NPR

The Freedom to Vote Act failed in the Senate this week. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said the bill was an overreach by Democrats in an attempt to federalize elections.

Members of the Trump administration clashed with the congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection. The committee recommended that former White House advisor Steve Bannon be held in contempt after he ignored their requests for cooperation.

Vaccine mandates are being extended. New York City will now require all city employees to be vaccinated. General Electric will also soon require all its U.S. workers to be vaccinated.

Meanwhile, a gang that kidnapped a group of American and Canadian missionaries has asked for a ransom of $17 million for their safe return. The White House said that the FBI is working on a solution.

The international community is struggling to address climate change. A U.N. report found that governments are on track to produce twice as much fossil fuel pollution as is necessary to keep global temperatures down by 2030.

We cover all this and more during the News Roundup.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

How Whistleblowers Have Put Big Tech On The Back Foot

por NPR

As the power of Silicon Valley's tech companies has grown, so too has the number of people willing to air their dirty laundry.

Facebook is the latest in the line of fire after whistleblower Francis Haugen's congressional testimony in early October.

Apple is also reeling from an internal crisis. One of the organizers of the #AppleToo movement was fired last week. But even though these organizations seem to be on the back foot, blowing the whistle is complicated and risky.

What does it take to be a whistleblower? And is it enough to actually implement change in Silicon Valley?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The Future of The Child Tax Credit

por NPR

Since the the Child Tax Credit went into effect in July, millions of children have been lifted out of poverty according to one study done by Columbia University. The program is set to end in a few weeks if Congress doesn't vote to make it permanent.

But there's a fight unfolding around what a permanent Child Tax Credit should look like—and who should get it.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The History And Impact Of Non-Unanimous Jury Decisions

por NPR

Non-unanimous jury convictions are no longer constitutional according to a 2020 Supreme Court ruling. But earlier this year, the court decided the decision does not automatically apply retroactively to old cases.

That's why more than 1,500 people in Louisiana are still imprisoned on non-unanimous verdicts — a law that originated in the Jim Crow era to "reestablish the supremacy of the white race." This includes the case of Brandon Jackson.

We talk about Jackson's case and the lasting impact of Jim Crow laws in Louisiana.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

What We Lose When We Lose Local News

por NPR

A new investigation by The Atlantic looks into Alden Global Capital, the secretive hedge fund that's gutted newsroom staff and owns more than 200 papers across the country including The Chicago Tribune, The Baltimore Sun, and the New York Daily News.

We speak to the reporter behind that investigation about what is lost when local newspapers are shut down.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Dave Grohl On Punk Rock, Nirvana, and Fatherhood

por NPR

Dave Grohl's shadow looms large over the music industry. He's the founder of the Grammy-winning rock group Foo Fighters. And he was the drummer for the groundbreaking grunge band Nirvana.

His musical footprint is matched only by the life he's led. In his new book "The Storyteller: Tales of Life and Music," Grohl recounts some of his life-changing musical moments.

We talk to Grohl about his new book and some of his most memorable moments.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The News Roundup for October 15, 2021

por NPR

The Biden Administration's investigation into the Jan. 6 insurrection is heating up. Former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen appeared before the committee to give testimony. Four other persons of interest have been subpoenaed this week and all have yet to appear.

Approximately 78 percent of the country is now some degree of vaccinated. Reporting indicates the racial disparities in whose received the jab has narrowed significantly. But, 1,900 people are dying per day due to COVID-19.

Meanwhile, China announced it had imported 20 percent more coal in September than it did the prior month, that's despite claims that it would cease funding coal mining operations abroad.

The European Union announces it would finance a $1 billion aid package for Afghanistan, raising questions over who exactly will be in control of the aid money.

Polish authorities are concerned with an uptick in human trafficking in Belarus, citing an increase in flights to Minsk from Iraq.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Allegations Of Harassment, Institutional Failures, And The NWSL

por NPR

A major investigation by The Athletic has brought accusations of sexual and verbal harassment by coaches in the National Women's Soccer League to light.

It prompted a weekend of game cancellations and calls for change. And when players returned to the field again last week, it was not to play as usual.

How was this allowed to happen? And where does the league go from here?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Vaccines, Misinformation, And Pregnancy

por NPR

The CDC is amping up its plea for pregnant people to get vaccinated.

Vaccination rates for pregnant people are far lower than those of the general public – fewer than one-third were vaccinated before or during their pregnancy despite pregnancy being on the CDC's list of conditions that increase the risk of contracting a severe case of COVID-19.

Clinical vaccine trials have historically excluded pregnant people and COVID-19 vaccines were no different. But studies conducted after the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were authorized showed that they have no adverse effects on those who were pregnant.

We'll talk about the factors contributing to those low vaccination rates among pregnant and breastfeeding people, including vaccine fertility misinformation.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

What Villains With Facial Differences Mean For People With Facial Differences

por NPR

In the newest James Bond movie, "No Time to Die", the main villain in the film, Safin, has scars covering his face. This has been the case for many past Bond villains.

But the trope isn't just limited to the Bond films. In Disney's "Black Widow," the main villain is revealed to have facial scarring covering her face. The same is true of the villain in "Wonder Woman," and even "The Lion King".

People with facial differences are speaking up about the harmful impact of being vilified on screen.

Changing Faces is an organization in the U.K. pushing the film industry to change the way it represents facial differences on-screen through the campaign "I Am Not Your Villain."

Why does the trope persist? And what does it mean for people with facial differences?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Facebook Under Fire: The Whistleblower, The Outage, And The Future

por NPR

Last week, whistleblower Frances Haugen testified before Congress about Facebook's problems.

A leaked trove of documents revealed that the company purposely hid research about its platform's negative effects on mental health in teenagers. Haugen also claimed that the company stoked division by allowing disinformation on the platform to go unchecked.

All of this and a worldwide outage that made Facebook and its family of apps inaccessible for hours.

But the platform's reputation has been crumbling for years and calls for internet regulations have been renewed.

Is this the final straw? Or just the latest installment in the Facebook saga?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The News Roundup for October 08, 2021

por NPR

A whistleblower has come forward to detail how Facebook's products "harm children, stoke division, and weaken democracy." Then, a worldwide outage of Facebook's products, including Instagram and WhatsApp, disrupted communication and business in multiple countries.

A federal judge has placed a pause on Texas' draconian abortion restrictions. However, the Texas attorney general has filed an appeal.

Meanwhile, an investigation of more than 12 million documents, dubbed the "Pandora Papers," have revealed how the rich and powerful worldwide hide their wealth while dodging regulation and taxes.

France's first major study of sexual abuse of children in the Catholic Church revealed a shockingly large estimate of the number of victims of sexual assault at the hands of the clergy.

We cover all this and more during the News Roundup.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.