Carry the One Radio: The Science Podcast

de Carry the One Radio

Igniting Scientific Curiosity

Episodios

Episode 161: We're All In This Together

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We, like many animals, live in groups. We need these groups to survive -- but why? What are the benefits of group living? What do we gain from each other? What quirks of evolution drove us to band together, form collectives, and solve problems together? In this episode, we’re joined by collective behavior researchers Iain Couzin and Naomi Leonard, who study networks, teamwork, and interactions between groups of everything from fish to robots to humans on social media. They discuss how we can get the most out of each other, what we can learn from creatures across all scales of life, and the beauty of our interconnected world. You can read more about our guests’ research on their lab websites. Iain Couzin work is on https://collectivebehaviour.com/research/ (and on Twitter @icouzin) and Naomi Leonard is https://naomi.princeton.edu/. This episode was written and produced by Celia Ford and Deanna Necula. Music from this episode was produced by Blue Dot Sessions. Episode art by Celia Ford, with vector art from The Noun Project. A full transcript of the episode is available in the show notes at carrytheoneradio.com.

Psychedelics Down to a Tea

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When you think about the future of medicine, do you picture cure-all pills? Instant diagnostics from a drop of blood? What about going back to the basics with plant-based treatments with a side of spiritual healing? In this episode, we sat down with scientist and social entrepreneur Dr. Victoria Hale, co-founder of an ayahuasca tea company called Sacred Medicines. Listen to our conversation about how psychedelics are making a comeback (especially in the mental health space), what it takes to get FDA approval for new treatments, and the ethical and cultural debate surrounding the increased Western attention on traditional ayahuasca tea ceremonies. Check out the episode page at carrytheoneradio.com for links to Sacred Medicines and more reading! This episode was produced by Stella Belonwu, Cindy Liu, and Seesha Takagishi. Episode art by Stella Belonwu and Seesha Takagishi. All music by Blue Dot Sessions.

Young Scientist Spotlight 17: Dr. Danielle Twum

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What do cancer cells and t-shirts have in common? You might be surprised! In this Young Scientist Spotlight, Dr Danielle Twum explains how she uses her communication skills and expertise to help doctors and researchers improve the way they treat cancer. In addition to working in industry, Dr Twum also works with AAAS IF/THEN to teach young students about being a scientist. We talk about her transition from studying corals to cancer, how the hungriest cells in our body can be a tumor’s best friend and the importance of telling a story with your science. By the end, you may never look at a shirt tag the same way again! This episode was produced by Maggie Colton with help from the team at CTOR. Music by Valentin Sosnitskiy. You can follow Dr Twum @forgedonyx on Twitter and Instagram.

Towards a Sustainable Earth

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The earth can’t wait, and it’s imperative that we are climate aware and are moved to action to maintain it. In this episode covering sustainability and climate change, we talk to Dr. Sheri Weiser, a physician-scientist at UCSF with a long history of researching food insecurity and climate justice. Dr. Weiser has been a Principal Investigator on over 25 research grants and has published over 165 manuscripts in this area. In our conversation with Dr. Weiser, we learn about how her work exposed her to the harsh climate realities faced by the food insecure on a daily basis. Additionally, Dr. Weiser shares her path to sustainability activism and some initiatives she has led in the UC system to tackle climate change with a key focus on environmental justice and equity. These include, but are not limited to, integrating sustainability across the UC curriculum, directing the Global Food Initiative at UCSF, co-leading the launch of UCSF’s EaRTH Center this Earth Day (April 22nd), and creating a myriad of opportunities for student involvement. To learn more about the Global Food Initiative, the UCSF Climate Change and Mental Health Task Force, the UCSF EaRTH Center, and the UCSF Human Health and Climate Change student group, see the links below! Global Food Initiative: https://www.ucop.edu/global-food-initiative/ Climate Change and Mental Health Task Force: https://psychiatry.ucsf.edu/climatechange EaRTH Center: https://earth.ucsf.edu/ Human Health and Climate Change Student Group: https://ucsf.campusgroups.com/club_signup?group_type=27712&category_tags= For free tickets to the Center for Climate Justice launch event, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/uc-center-for-climate-justice-launch-event-tickets-148653952975?aff=erelexpmlt This episode was written and produced by Rachel Rock and Stella Belonwu with editing help from the rest of the CTOR team. Music used in this episode is by Blue Dot Sessions and Niklas Schreiber.

Global Health in the Time of COVID: Dr. Patience Afulani and Dr. Dilys Walker

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Before this episode, if someone asked me what could be done to improve maternal and newborn health outcomes, one of the last things on my mind would have been “kindness” because that part should be obvious, right? Wrong. In this episode, we speak with Dr. Afulani and Dr.Walker, two faculty members in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and affiliates with the Institute of Global Health Sciences at UCSF. They share information about the disparities in women’s health and the importance of patient-centered care across the globe, particularly in these pandemic times, where navigating patient interactions with physicians can be varied and complex.

Global Health in the Time of COVID: Ramses Escobado, Jess Celentano, and Dr. Mike Reid

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Contact tracing is a term that almost all of us are familiar with, but what exactly does it entail? As part of a collaboration with the Institute of Global Health Sciences (IGHS) at UCSF, we spoke to three contact tracing experts in San Francisco. From our conversations with librarian and manager at the Excelsior Branch Public Library Ramses Escobado, deputy director of the Center for Global Health Delivery, Diplomacy and Economics Jess Celentano, and Infectious disease doctor Mike Reid, we discuss contact tracing from epidemiological and health equity lens. We discuss their newly found roles in the sector of contact tracing, how contact tracing goes beyond facilitating infected parties to quarantine, the barriers to contact tracing, how to measure the success of contact tracing efforts, what characteristics make a good contact tracer, and how we envision a future post COVID-19. This interview was conducted via zoom in September 2020. If you’d like to learn more about current contact tracing efforts and the resources that are available for people impacted by the pandemic, be sure to check out the following links: https://oewd.org/employees-impacted-covid-19#Paid%20Sick%20Leave https://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/ https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/php/principles-contact-tracing.html https://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/covid-19/contact-tracing This episode was written and produced by Stella Belonwu, Maggie Colton, and Ben Mansky. Music from this episode was produced by Blue Dot Sessions and 4barrelcarb

Young Scientist Spotlight 16: Rebekah Rashford

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Let’s be real -- life can be stressful. For those facing early life stress, the consequences can even affect their very biology. Fortunately, Rebekah Rashford is a young Ph.D. candidate at Princeton University who is uncovering just how these stressors affect people. In this Young Scientist Spotlight (our 16th!), Rebekah Rashford shares how she began her journey in science, her sources of inspiration, and how she balances her hobbies with her academic pursuits. You’ll discover that her joy for scientific discoveries is exceptionally infectious! This episode was produced by Kanchi Mehta. Music used in this episode is Town Market by the Blue Dot Sessions. This interview was completed via Zoom in October 2020.

Playing the Genetic Lottery: Understanding Rare Diseases

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Roughly 4% of the world’s population is affected by a rare disease, and while we are learning every day how to better diagnose and treat these conditions, there is still much to uncover. Rare Disease Day, which lands on the last day of February every year, seeks to raise awareness and improve access to care for patients and families living with rare diseases. For both scientific and clinical perspectives, we speak with Dr. William Gahl from the NIH, as well as Linda Manwaring, a genetic counselor from Washington University in St. Louis. In addition, we hear directly from a young patient named Aiden and his caregiver, Shaun, about their experiences living with a rare disease. This episode was written and produced by Iris Chin, Marilyn Steyert, and Devika Nair with editing help from the rest of the CTOR team. Music used in this episode is by Blue Dot Sessions. For more information on Rare Disease Day, visit https://www.rarediseaseday.org/, and to learn more about the Undiagnosed Disease Network, visit https://undiagnosed.hms.harvard.edu/.

Episode 153: Art is Science is Art (Part 2): The Impact

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We don’t usually hear the words science and art together, but we’ve been misled -- science and art exist together on multiple planes, constantly informing each other in beautiful and unexpected ways. This is the second episode in our two-part mini-series on science and art. Here, we’re joined by visual artists and science communicators Kelly Montgomery and Sophie Wang. They both discuss how they’ve used art to communicate big ideas, and how scientists can approach making knowledge more accessible. We’d like to share some comic excerpts from JKX’s latest project "Gaining STEAM!". They are done by each of the co-founders. The excerpt titled "Squirrel Comic..." is by Jaye Gardiner. The design titled "Khoa" is by Khoa Tran. Lastly, the work titled "Kelly" is by Kelly. To see more of their work, check out jkxcomics.com, or @JKXcomics on Instagram or Twitter. Sophie’s activist collective, Free Radicals, posts on freerads.org, and are on Instagram and Twitter @freeradsorg. This episode was written and produced by Stella Belonwu, Celia Ford, and Devika Nair. Music from this episode was produced by Blue Dot Sessions. Episode art by Stella Belonwu.

Young Scientist Spotlight 15: Gaby Keeler-May

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Did you know you could scuba dive for science? Well, that’s exactly what Gaby Keeler-May does in the waters of New Zealand! In our latest Young Scientist Spotlight episode (#15!), learn about how Gaby’s scuba diving class in Santa Cruz, California, led her to investigating invasive seaweeds in New Zealand! We discuss how she conducts each dive (safety first!) and what they do with the tons of seaweed they pull from the waters (spoiler alert: it may become your next meal!). Gaby also shares her experience applying to graduate school internationally and being a PhD student who has had over 5 years of work experience. By the end of this episode, you’ll want to be swimming with the seaweeds of New Zealand, too!

Young Scientist Spotlight 14: Sero Parel

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You feeling stressed? Well, take a break from work and listen to our latest Young Scientist Spotlight with Sero Parel. Sero is a Neuroscience graduate student at Princeton University, who is interested in studying stress and how stressful moments can change the course of our developing brain. For Sero, their research goes way beyond any old science experiment. Their work asks fundamental questions about what is actually happening to the brains of those whose lives are impacted by certain levels of stress. In this conversation you will get a glimpse into how an activist and a graduate student in neuroscience can be one and the same person. This episode was produced by Hasan Alkhairo. To learn more about Sero, you can follow them on Twitter at @mx_sero.

Art is Science is Art (Part 1): The Process

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We don’t usually hear the words science and art together, but we’ve been misled -- science and art exist together on multiple planes, constantly informing each other in beautiful and unexpected ways. This is the first episode in our two-part mini-series on science and art. Here, we’re joined by choreographer-slash-educator Suba Subramaniam and computational-biologist-slash-generative-artist Dr. Alex Naka. They describe how they each blended science and art through their own career journeys, how the methodology of science can be used as an artistic tool, and how the creative process drives scientific curiosity. To see more of Suba’s work, you can follow her South Asian dance organization on Instagram @akademidance and on Twitter @akademi. You can find photos and videos of Alex’s artwork (along with his thoughts on science) on Instagram @bb_bygones and on Twitter @gottapatchemall This episode was written and produced by Stella Belonwu, Celia Ford, and Devika Nair. Music from this episode was produced by EminYILDIRIM, Orangefreesounds, ajaysm, Mvrasseli, florianreichelt, kjartan_abel, Humus3000, and Uzerx, and acquired from www.freesound.org. Episode art by Stella Belonwu, featuring original plotter art by Alex Naka.

Young Scientist Spotlight 13: Balint Kacsoh

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New Year, new you, new …. ant? Dr. Balint Kacsoh, a postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses his work on the genetics of social interactions in ants in our latest Young Scientist Spotlight. Listening to this conversation, you’ll learn a ton of interesting ant facts, like how ants bites are used to staple together wounds in the jungle. You'll also learn some amazing ways that ant research can help us understand how loneliness affects disease progression. From 3D printed ant models to the intricacies of garbage disposal, Balint’s research and scientific outreach has something for everyone.

Young Scientist Spotlight 12: Stephanie Renee

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Stephanie Renee is a non-traditional undergraduate student. After working in non-scientific fields, she decided to go back to school a few years ago to pursue a bachelor's in neuroscience with the goal of becoming a clinical neuropsychologist. In this spotlight interview, she shares her experiences working in a metastatic breast cancer lab, her thoughts on science education and research training as an undergrad, as well as her love for weird medical history facts, which she talks about in her own podcast, "Charlatan"! This episode was produced by Devika Nair with editing help from the rest of the CTOR team. Music used in this episode is by Blue Dot Sessions. Follow Stephanie on Twitter @OsmosisReads and subscribe to her podcast "Charlatan" on Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/58Lc3MyOFSEgdxxx1olOU4

Chronic(les) of Pain: Treatment & Research

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“All day strong, all day long”, “the painkiller hospitals use most”, “the extra strength pain reliever”. We see pain reducing drugs like Advil and Aleve advertised all the time. But how do these drugs actually work? Can they relieve all types of pain? What about prescription drugs? Why are opioids the best we have, and awful at the same time? How are new medicines evaluated? And is anyone trying to find a way to make all the pain go away? This is the second episode in our two-part mini-series on pain. We’ll be joined again by the two esteemed experts that helped us learn about this invisible disease in the first episode: Dr. Allan Basbaum, Professor and Chair of the Department of Anatomy at UCSF, and Dr. Ishmail Abdus-Saboor, Assistant Professor of Biology at the University of Pennsylvania. In this episode, they will describe the current types of treatments available for various pain conditions, and also highlight exciting new treatments for painful maladies that may be available soon. They explain how optimism from the placebo effect can act as a painkiller, and how this phenomenon complicates the development of new drugs. In addition, we’ll talk about some amazing experiments going on in their labs right now; our experts are trying to identify and understand parts of the pain system that have previously alluded researchers. They explain how their research results could inform development of more precise pain drugs, so you can get that all day long relief, without the nasty side effects. This episode was written and produced by Nancy Cai, Cindy Liu, Ryan Morrie, and Marilyn Steyert. Music in this episode is by Blue Dot Sessions. Episode art by Ryan Morrie.

Young Scientist Spotlight 11: Oluwasegun Akinniyi

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For this eleventh installment of “The Spotlight” we interviewed Oluwasegun Akiniyi, a bioengineering masters student at Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile Ife, Osun State, Nigeria. We talked about his education journey and current research endeavors using a robotic device to rehabilitate the hand of stroke patients. We discussed how his identity influences his research, and the intricacies of pursuing a research career in Nigeria. Additionally, we discussed his newfound love for traveling and gardening, and his future academic pursuits. This episode was written and produced by Stella Belonwu. Music from this episode was produced by Tictac9, Joe_anderson22, Josefpres, Uzerx, and Monkeyman535, and acquired from www.freesound.org.

Young Scientist Spotlight 10: Maria Servetnik

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A brain is very computationally efficient – you can look at a group of objects and your brain will instantly calculate the average features (size, orientation, etc). But how fast is this process – can it even be done with images that flash by so quickly you aren’t sure if you even saw them? To learn more, we interviewed Maria Servetnik, a Master’s student at the University of Leuven in Belgium who is currently testing this hypothesis. In our conversation, we also discussed the importance of mentorship, her journey from journalism to science, the challenges of communicating science to people who don’t trust the scientific process, and how to stay sane amidst the combined struggles of grad school and 2020. This episode was produced by Katie Cabral. Music featured in this episode: Perspiration, Color Country, and Yarrow and Root, all by Blue Dot Sessions.

Young Scientist Spotlight 9: Dr. Yan Wang

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What do bumblebees and octopuses have in common? They’re both invertebrates - or as Dr. Yan Wang says, “the shiny and squishy things.” And what makes them different? Well, beyond the obvious, octopuses are extremely anti-social, while bumblebees depend on their societies to survive. In this episode, you’ll hear about Dr. Wang’s research on bees and how they get their roles in bee society plus a little about octopus cannibals. In the second half of the episode, Dr. Wang shares her perspective on the complex ways race and white supremacy interact in the university setting and beyond. This episode was produced by Ben Mansky, with help from the rest of the CTOR team.

Pain Part 1: The Invisible Disease

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Ever stepped on a Lego? Taken a fall during a sports match? Had an awful headache? Yeah, we have, too. Why are they all such awful experiences? Well, simply put, they all cause pain. But… what exactly is pain? In the first episode of our two-part mini-series on pain, we will hear from experts in the field of pain research: Dr. Allan Basbaum, Professor and Chair of the Department of Anatomy at UCSF, as well as Dr. Ishmail Abdus-Saboor, Assistant Professor of Biology at the University of Pennsylvania. They will help us to define pain, figure out what factors contribute to how we feel pain, and classify it in various ways. We will also hear personal stories from a friend who has been dealing with chronic pain for many years now. As we’ll learn, pain can really affect the way a person lives their life, and can be a disease in and of itself. Once we understand pain a little better, we can start to treat it! So, stay tuned for the second episode in the mini-series where we’ll learn what our experts are doing to further understand and combat pain. This episode was written and produced by Nancy Cai, Cindy Liu, Ryan Morrie, and Marilyn Steyert. Music in this episode is by Blue Dot Sessions. Episode art by Ryan Morrie.

Young Scientist Spotlight 8: Dr. Katherine Hatcher

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How do our brains control reproduction (and eating, and sleeping, and drinking, and everything)? How do you submit your dissertation, get a PhD, move across the country, and join a new lab in the midst of a global pandemic without totally losing it? In this Young Scientist Spotlight, we talked with Dr. Katherine Hatcher to find out! This episode was produced by Celia Ford. Music used in this episode is by Blue Dot Sessions on Free Music Archive. Dr. Hatcher also produces her own podcast! Check out Endocrine Disruptors to hear interviews with the scientists behind all your favorite hormones: https://endocrinepod.com

Young Scientist Spotlight 7: Dr. Debora Kamin Mukaz

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Science doesn't happen in a vacuum, and racism both in science and society contributes to disparities in the health outcomes of Black Americans. In this episode of The Spotlight, we talked to Dr. Debora Kamin Mukaz about her work studying how social factors and biology converge to affect risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Hear about her journey into epidemiology, and what doing this research means to her. For more info about the two examples of mistreatment of Black people by the scientific establishment referenced in this episode, visit carrytheoneradio.com/episodes/yss-7

Walking on a Dream

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Are you tossing and turning all night? Well, what’s the secret to a good night’s sleep, anyway? And what really is the answer to Billie Eilish’s album, When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?

In this episode, we talk to Dr. Ying-Hui Fu, a professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Fu has been researching sleep for decades, and her book Sleep to Thrive is available now. Our conversation with her revealed why it’s important to prioritize sleep in our busy schedules and that there’s so much we can discover from people who can sleep fewer hours and still lead high-functioning, productive lives. She also let us in on the answer to whether dolphins really sleep with one hemisphere of their brain “awake.” Tune in to learn more!

This episode was written and produced by Katie Cabral, Kanchi Mehta, Cindy Liu, and Li Wang. Music in this episode is from the Blue Dot Sessions and Baby Relax Channel on YouTube. Cover art courtesy of Cindy Liu and Kanchi Mehta.  

More Resources
UC Berkeley researchers identified a unique EEG signature that occurs during REM sleep: Brain noise contains unique signature of dream sleep.

Young Scientist Spotlight 6: Nancy Padilla

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How do our brains know who’s boss? In this Young Scientist Spotlight, neuroscientist Dr. Nancy Padilla tells us how she studies social dominance in mice. In the process, she walks us through her journey from college in Puerto Rico to postdoctoral research in California, sharing lessons learned along the way. We can’t wait for you to meet this rising neuroscience star! This episode was produced by Celia Ford. Music used in this episode is by Blue Dot Sessions on Free Music Archive. Episode art by Ben Mansky. A full transcript is available at tinyurl.com/nancy-padilla-ep. Dr. Padilla also produces her own podcast! Check out Stories of Women in Neuroscience (www.storiesofwin.org) to hear more interviews with brilliant women doing outstanding science. Image Description: An Erlenmeyer flask filled with red liquid sits in a pool of light in front of an orange background.

Your Doctor Hates This One Weird Trick: A Feminist History of Homeopathy

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These days, homeopathy and some forms of alternative medicine fall soundly in the realm of pseudoscience. Not only that, but the wellness industry has capitalized on the popularity of these practices in predatory ways, selling promises of improved health with no evidence to back them up. In the United States, the marketing of these alternative ‘wellness’ products primarily targets women – evidenced by yoni eggs, vaginal steamers, and more. If we turn back the clock about 150 years, however, homeopathic medicine didn’t look so different from the techniques being practiced in the medical mainstream. There was one important distinction, though – homeopathic medical colleges were more welcoming to women. Join us as we trace the complicated relationship between feminism, healing, and alternative medicine from its origins to the present day. This episode was written and produced by Deanna Necula and Ben Mansky. The poem was read by Stella Belonwu. Music and sound effects used in this episode include Old Ralley by Lobo Loco, I Feel Sad by Scanglobe, and Discovery Harbor by Blue Dot Sessions on Free Music Archive and Chopping Vegetables from ancorapazzo on Freesound. For more information on sources referenced in this episode, visit carrytheoneradio.com/episodes/homeopathy.

The Fault in our Crust

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If you live in an earthquake-prone area, there's probably one question on your mind a lot of the time: when is the next big one going to hit? In this episode, we talk earthquake prediction with Dr. Barbara Romanowicz, a geophysicist at UC Berkeley and the former director of the Berkeley Seismology Lab. And while earthquake prediction is definitely important, our conversation revealed to us that there's so much more we can learn from earthquakes. Earthquakes (and their sister natural phenomena volcanoes) can teach us about the history of the geography that surrounds us and the make-up of the Earth beneath our feet. And just like any good science, earthquakes can reveal even deeper questions than we knew to ask before. Strap in and join us for a wild ride through the center of the Earth, with stopovers in California, Japan, and on the newest Hawaiian volcano. This episode was written and produced by Anna Lipkin, Cindy Liu, and Kanchi Mehta. Music in this episode is by Blue Dot Sessions, Kai Engel, Ketsa, and Six Umbrellas from the FreeMusicArchive. Episode art from Public Domain Vectors.

Young Scientist Spotlight 5: Jen Pearlstein

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“You just do things differently and that's fine!” In the fifth Spotlight, UC Berkeley's Jen Pearlstein talks about her research on how stress affects decision making, how she's making mental health care more accessible, and being a disabled scientist. Find her on Twitter @JenPearlstein and check out her blog, Voicing Vulnerability at http://voicingvulnerability.blogspot.com/. For more of Jen's writing about being a disabled trainee, read her paper linked below: Pearlstein & Soyster (2019). Supervisory Experiences of Trainees With Disabilities: The Good, the Bad, and the Realistic https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Peter_Soyster/publication/335074084_Supervisory_experiences_of_trainees_with_disabilities_The_good_the_bad_and_the_realistic/links/5e161d6f92851c8364bbba7a/Supervisory-experiences-of-trainees-with-disabilities-The-good-the-bad-and-the-realistic.pdf Music by Broke for Free, Blue Dot Sessions, and Ketsa - from FreeMusicArchive. Episode art by Ben Mansky.

Of Brains and Machines

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Artificial intelligence guides nearly every aspect of our lives: what TV shows we’re recommended, whose opinions we see on social media, what we buy, how we invest our money...the list is endless. But what does “artificial intelligence” mean? What do these algorithms know? If we could look inside a robot’s mind, would we see a reflection of ourselves? Dr. Dan Yamins, Dr. Kim Stachenfeld, and Dr. Grace Lindsay helped us explore what it means to be intelligent, and what separates humans from machines. This episode was written and produced by Celia Ford, Devika Nair, and Li Wang with editing help from the rest of the CTOR team. Music used in this episode by Blue Dot Sessions and sound effects from FreeMusicArchive. Cover image courtesy of Ben Mansky.

Global Health in the Time of COVID - ft. Dr. Madhavi Dandu and Dr. Elizabeth Fair

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Global Health in the Time of COVID is a miniseries from the Institute for Global Health Sciences at UCSF produced by Carry the One Radio. Each week, we speak to health experts at UCSF to learn more about them, their work, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed their practice and research. In this week's episode, we talk to Dr. Madhavi Dandu, a clinician and professor of medicine at UCSF who directs the Master’s Program in Global Health, and Dr. Elizabeth Fair, an infectious disease epidemiologist who directs UCSF’s PhD Program in Global Health. We discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the course of Global Health education, why the US’s pandemic response has fallen short, and what we can learn from looking abroad. This interview took place on May 28th, 2020 and reflects the state of the news and scientific literature at that time. This episode was produced by Ben Mansky and Nancy Cai. Music used in this episode: Slow Lane Lover, Dance of Felt, San Diego Sunday, and Hundred Mile by Blue Dot Sessions. News clips used in the introduction are courtesy of Cleveland Clinic via the CDC.

Global Health in the Time of COVID - ft. Maeve Forster, Alexandra Keir, Jane Fieldhouse, and Dr. Lucia Abascal

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Global Health in the Time of COVID is a miniseries from the Institute for Global Health Sciences at UCSF produced by Carry the One Radio. Each week, we speak to health experts at UCSF to learn more about them, their work, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed their practice and research. In this week's episode, we talk to Alexandra Keir, Jane Fieldhouse, Dr. Lucia Abascal, and Maeve Forster, who are students and staff in the UCSF Global Health Sciences program. Since March, they have been working as part of the team behind Research Watch, a project to rapidly summarize new COVID-19 research and communicate it to healthcare workers, scientists, and policy makers. In our interview, we discuss the project, the challenges associated with staying up to date in an ever-changing field, the differences between responses to COVID-19 across the globe, and the major takeaways of the research that's been done so far. To learn more about Research Watch and sign up for their newsletter, head to https://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/covid-19/ucsf-ighs-covid-19-research-watch This interview took place on May 20th, 2020 and reflects the state of the news and scientific literature at that time. This episode was produced by Katie Cabral and Ben Mansky. Music used in this episode: Slow Lane Lover and Hundred Mile by Blue Dot Sessions. News clips used in the introduction are courtesy of Cleveland Clinic via the CDC.

Global Health in the Time of COVID ft. Dr. Kimberly Baltzell

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Global Health in the Time of COVID is a miniseries from the Institute for Global Health Sciences at UCSF produced by Carry the One Radio. Each week, we speak to health experts at UCSF to learn more about them, their work, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed their practice and research. Our first episode features Dr. Kim Baltzell, a professor of nursing at UCSF and director of Global Action in Nursing (GAIN), a project that promotes clinical training in sub-saharan Africa. This episode was written and produced by Kanchi Mehta and Devika Nair with editing help from the rest of the CTOR team. Music used in this episode includes: Slow Lane Lover, San Diego Sunday, Dance of Felt, Dusting, and Hundred Mile by Blue Dot Sessions. News clips used in the introduction are courtesy of Cleveland Clinic via the CDC.

Young Scientist Spotlight 4: Jhia Jackson

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For this fourth installment of “The Spotlight” we interviewed Jhia Jackson, who is a sociology PhD candidate at UCSF. We discussed her educational journey, current research on pediatric palliative and hospice care, her career as a professional dancer, being black at UCSF, cats, and ways to stay sane in grad school. This episode was written and produced by Stella Belonwu. Music from this episode was acquired from www.freesound.org. Music included in this episode: Dinglebells by evanjones4, Game background Music loop short by yummie, Invisible world - electronic music loop by frankum, more Jazz guitar.wav by Sub-d, and "Chorus music - Techno loop" by frankum.

God, Coal, and Fossils: The Story of the First Dinosaur

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We pretty much all accept the idea that dinosaurs once roamed the earth, but this wasn’t always the case. A few centuries ago, nobody believed animals could even go extinct. It would take huge societal upheaval and a few very determined oddballs to change people’s minds. In this episode, we follow the eccentric geologists and fossil-hunters who uncovered the first dinosaur, with author Ian Lendler as our guide. This episode was written and produced by Arja Ray, Ben Mansky, and Nancy Cai. Ian’s book, The First Dinosaur: How Science Solved the Greatest Mystery on Earth, is available wherever books are sold.

Beleaf What You Wanna Beleaf

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In this episode, we’re getting into the weeds of cannabis research. Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug in the world, but there is still so much we do not know about it.. To learn more, we spoke to two cannabis researchers: Dr. Steven Laviolette, a neurobiologist at The University of Western Ontario in London, Canada, and Dr. Salomeh Keyhani, a general internist and a health services researcher at UCSF’s Veteran Affairs Medical Center. From our conversation with Steven, we got insight into his lab’s findings on THC and CBD as they relate to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, his approaches to use these cannabis constituents to combat these disorders, the funding landscape of cannabis research, the Canadian cannabis industry, and his thoughts on the future of cannabis research. In our interview with Salomeh, we learned about her motivation to study cannabis, as well as her approaches to understand things ranging from its public perception to cardiovascular health effects. This episode was written and produced by Stella Belonwu, and Seesha Takagishi. Music and sound effects from this episode were acquired from www.freesound.org. Music and sound effects included in this episode: Samba Game Theme Loop by Daniel Noronha Bostwana Dream & Slow Down by Goran Andrić Harp by Pryght One Ba Dum Tish Comedy Punchline Drums by djlprojects Intro 1L72 by Sentuniman Plucked Synth Loop by Stereo Surgeon 130 bpm by LS Slip the e to g by Aceinet ReDub by Kkz Custom Groovy Beat by Monkeyman535

Shark Tales

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It’s a tale (or tail?) as old as time. Sharks have been around for at least 400 million years - proof of their resilience, but there’s still so much to learn about these majestic creatures. From their social dynamics to the different kinds of shark-tracking devices currently in use, we spoke to Michelle Jewell, the Chief Science Communicator in the Department of Applied Ecology at NC State University. In this episode, she shared personal stories from her graduate school days as a white shark researcher in South Africa to what she does today as a science communicator for a university. This episode was written and produced by Devika Nair and Li Wang with editing help from the rest of the CTOR team. Music used in this episode: Tiny Putty, Game Hens, Hundred Mile, Bundt, Borough, Slow Lane Lover, Front Runner, Calm and Collected, Beignet, and Tar and Spackle by Blue Dot Sessions. Sound effects from FreeMusicArchive. Cover Image courtesy of Michelle Jewell. For more information on Michelle’s work, please visit https://michelleajewell.com/.

Women in Science: Dr. Marina Sirota

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Welcome to Women in Science, a special series in honor of Women’s History Month. Join us each Monday in March as we hear from women making great strides in their fields, from reproductive health justice to animal evolution. We’ll learn about the challenges they’ve faced in their journeys, explore the importance of representation, and see how women on the forefront of science and medicine lift up others and build toward a better tomorrow. In the fifth and final episode of this series, we’re featuring Dr. Marina Sirota, an assistant professor at the Bakar Computational Health Sciences Institute at UCSF. We talk about how one can use troves of data to make important medical discoveries– but also about the challenges of leveraging so much information. Among other things, we also discuss the rewards of introducing young girls to the beauty of data science, and what it’s like to transition between industry and academia.